Search Constraints

Search Results

  • Model results for "Modeling study of geospace system response to the solar wind dynamic pressure enhancement on March 17, 2015"

    Work
    Creator: Dogacan Ozturk
    Description: -3D binary files from BATSRUS/CRCM/RIM [2 files] -2D ascii files from RIM [5 files] -1D asci files for virtual ground magnetometers [5 files] -3D binary files from GITM [5 files] -1D ascii file from GITM [1 file]
  • Low-Fe(III) Greenalite Was a Primary Mineral from Neoarchean Oceans (Raw Data)

    Work
    Creator: Johnson, Jena E.
    Description: Raw data accompanying manuscript with same title, including CLS raw data, SSRL raw data, and XRD raw data.
  • TCCIII Near-Wall Flow

    Work
    Creator: Sick, Volker , Reuss, David L, and Greene, Mark L
    Description: This archive contains data files from spark-ignited homogeneous combustion internal combustion engine experiments. Included are high-resolution two-dimensional two-component velocity fields acquired at two 5 x 6 mm regions, one near the head and one near the piston. Crank angle resolved heat flux measurements were made at a third location in the head. The engine was operated at 40 kPa, 500 and 1300 RPM, motor and fired. Included are in-cylinder pressure measurements, external pressure and temperature data, as well as details on the geometry of the optical engine to enable setups of simulation configurations. and PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS A LARGE DATA SET (11GB) AND IS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD VIA GLOBUS: https://www.globus.org/app/transfer?origin_id=99d8c648-a9ff-11e7-aedd-22000a92523b&origin_path=%2Fdownload%2FVolkerSick%2F
  • Data in support of the study "Climate response to negative greenhouse gas radiative forcing in polar winter"

    Work
    Creator: Flanner, Mark
    Description: Greenhouse gas (GHG) additions to Earth’s atmosphere initially reduce global outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), thereby warming the planet. In select environments with temperature inversions, however, increased GHG concentrations can actually increase local OLR. Negative top-of-atmosphere and effective radiative forcing (ERF) from this situation give the impression that local surface temperatures could cool in response to GHG increases. Here we consider an extreme scenario in which GHG concentrations are increased only within the warmest layers of winter near-surface inversions of the Arctic and Antarctic. We find, using a fully coupled Earth system model, that the underlying surface warms despite the GHG addition exerting negative ERF and cooling the troposphere in the vicinity of the GHG increase. This unique radiative forcing and thermal response is facilitated by the high stability of the polar winter atmosphere, which inhibits thermal mixing and amplifies the impact of surface radiative forcing on surface temperature. These findings also suggest that strategies to exploit negative ERF via injections of short-lived GHGs into inversion layers would likely be unsuccessful in cooling the planetary surface.
  • Demographically diverse crowds are typically not much wiser than homogeneous crowds

    Work
    Creator: de Oliveira, Stephanie and Nisbett, Richard E.
    Description: The data are generally interpretable when examined in conjunction with the target article. Codebooks are in preparation and further information can be obtained from the first author.
  • Predicting Crystal Structures using Digital Alchemy Inverse Materials Design and the Random Forest Technique of Machine Learning

    Work
    Creator: Geng, Yina, Van Anders, Greg, and Glotzer, Sharon C.
    Description: The data are the 13 target structures used in developing our model for predicting colloidal crystal structures from the geometries of particular shapes. The target structures are: simple cubic (SC), body-centered cubic (BCC), face-centered cubic (FCC), simple chiral cubic (SCC), hexagonal (HEX-1-0.6), diamond (D), graphite (G), honeycomb (H), body-centered tetragonal (BCT-1-1-2.4), high-pressure Lithium (Li), Manganese (beta-Mn), Uranium (beta-U), Tungsten (beta-W). At least nine simulations were run on each of the target structures. All of the data are formatted as .pos files.
  • Data for "Using sensor data to dynamically map large-scale models to site-scale forecasts: A case study using the National Water Model"

    Work
    Creator: Fries, Kevin J
    Description: This data is in support of the publication in review "Using sensor data to dynamically map large-scale models to site-scale forecasts: A case study using the National Water Model". It is all the raw data extracted from the NWM flow forecasts for Iowa and the IFIS stage readings. For the NWM data, each date has it's own tab-delimited file with columns being the time (hrs) and rows being the NHD site. For the IFIS gages, each tab delimited file is for a single site for the period of record.
  • S'Urachi Site-Based Archaeological Survey 2015

    Work
    Creator: Gosner, Linda R. and Smith, Alexander J.
    Description: Included here are 1) a detailed description of each of the dataset's components, 2) a database of all finds from the 2015 survey, 3) a database of faunal bone compiled by specialist Damià Ramis, 4) a description of the finds by category to accompany these databases, 5) a PDF of notes taken in the field, 6) field photographs of survey units, 7) object photographs of all finds, and 8) drawings of diagnostic ceramics by time period.
  • Computer Data from Ross Thesis

    Work
    Creator: Mathews, Elizabeth and Verhoff, Frank
    Description: Each pdf is an electronic version of the paper output for each experiment. Each text file is the electronic version of the data on the computer cards for each experiment. These text files are directly readable by Excel. Once in Excel, the data can be manipulated as desired. Additional information is in the theses.
  • Neighborhood effects : Health Status

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    Creator: Veinot,Tiffany,C., Data Driven Detroit, and Okullo, Dolorence
    Description: Health status data includes data about the health of persons within a census tract in Metropolitan Detroit, measured at the census tract level. This includes data about 1) mortality by condition; 2) exposures to toxic substances; and 3) disability. Coverage for all data: 10-county Detroit-Warren-Ann Arbor Combined Statistical Area.
  • Neighborhood effects : Housing

    Work
    Creator: Veinot, Tiffany, Yu, DeAhean, Data Driven Detroit, Okullo, Dolorence, Gomez-Lopez, Iris N., and Yan, Xiang (Jacob)
    Description: This dataset includes census tract-level data concerning housing in Metropolitan Detroit. The data includes: 1) Total housing units and total mortgages in the tract; 2) Land use; 3) Real estate information (foreclosures, sales transactions, and home values); 4) Vacant housing; 5) Housing age and available facilities; 6) Housing condition; and 7) Spatial measures of subsidized housing in the tract. Data coverage should say 2006 to 2015.
  • Centimeter-Scale Electron Diffusion in Photoactive Organic Heterostructures

    Work
    Creator: Qu, Yue, Panda, Anurag, Che, Xiaozhou, Forrest, Stephen R., Coburn, Caleb, and Burlingame, Quinn
    Description: Mathematica Diffusion Simulation: Programmed by Coburn, Caleb. Simulation of diffusion in organic heterostructures, including least square fits and statistical goodness of fit analysis. Used to calculate fits to transient data in Fig 1, 3 and Extended Data Fig.2. Example data file included for download Matlab Montecarlo simulation: Programmed by Coburn, Caleb. Montecarlo simulation of charge diffusion on a cubic lattice to determine lateral diffusion length as a function of barrier height, assuming thermionic emission over the barrier. Matlab 2D Diffusion Simulation:Programmed by Coburn, Caleb. Modified from BYU Physics 430 Course Manual. Simulates diffusion around a film discontinuity, such a cut. Used to generate fits to Extended Data Fig. 1
  • Crop rotations for increased soil carbon: perenniality as a guiding principle

    Work
    Creator: Blesh, Jennifer and King, Alison E.
    Description: This dataset contains three data files used in: King, A.E. and J. Blesh, 2017. Crop rotations for increased soil carbon: perenniality as a guiding principle. Ecological Applications. There are also three corresponding metadata files. The file “CRMA 2017 Main.csv” contains data for the control and treatment rotations used to construct pairwise comparisons for meta-analysis, response ratios calculated for soil organic carbon concentration, and change in carbon input. The dataset also includes management, soil, and other environmental characteristics for each site. The file “CRMA 2017 Diversity x Nitrogen.csv” contains data used to test whether N fertilizer inputs mediated the effect of functional diversity on SOC concentrations. The file “CRMA Annual grain.csv” contains data used to test for effects of crop rotation species diversity (one vs. two species, or two vs. three species) on SOC concentrations and C input (i.e., for the “grain-only” rotations). The dataset also includes management, soil, and other environmental characteristics for each site. The corresponding metadata files: “CRMA 2017 Main_metadata.csv”, “CRMA 2017 Diversity x Nitrogen_metadata.csv”, and “CRMA Annual grain _metadata.csv” provide a detailed description of all variables in each dataset. Note: On Jan 12, 2018 the following information was added to the three metadata files: the name of the data file the metadata refers to, an explanation as to the meaning of blank cells in the data file, a full citation to the paper where the author describes her findings and contact information for the author.
  • WRF-Chem Central US - Hygroscopicity tests

    Work
    Creator: Steiner, Allison and Kawecki, Stacey
    Description: WRF-Chem model
  • Discovering History: An Analysis of Secondary Literature Cited in the American Historical Review, 2010-2015

    Work
    Creator: Pearce, Alexa L.
    Description: This dataset accompanies a study that seeks to contribute to a clearer understanding of the discovery ecosystem in academic research libraries. Using historical literature as a case study, extensive citation analysis is employed to both reveal characteristics of secondary historical literature as well as to test a broad disciplinary discovery environment that includes six specific search platforms. By enhancing our understanding of where and how specific types of resources are –or are not—discoverable, as the case may be, this study can provide evidence to better inform the appropriate role and placement of various search platforms in a user’s process. This citation analysis drew upon all secondary literature that was cited in the American Historical Review (AHR) during a six-year period, from 2010 through 2015. The AHR is the official publication of the American Historical Association (AHA) and, as stated on its website, has served as “the journal of record for the historical profession in the United States since 1895.” Additionally, the AHR represents all subfields of history in its research articles and reviews of new scholarship. For this study, the author gathered citations from research articles only, excluding reviews. For the purposes of testing the library discovery environment, the author aimed to include citations that a researcher would be likely to identify by using library research tools, as opposed to archival finding aids. Recognizing that some tools included in this study, such as JSTOR and Historical Abstracts, do not index archival sources, the author decided to focus on published and secondary materials. All citations to archival sources, government information, and other unpublished manuscript materials were excluded. Additionally, citations to newspaper and general or popular press articles published prior to 1900 were excluded. Citations to entire periodicals, as opposed to articles, were also excluded. Books from all date ranges were included. Citations to non-scholarly newspaper and magazine articles published after 1900 were included. Citations to published primary sources were also included in the population of citations, as one may reasonably expect to locate them in a research library setting. The resulting population comprised 22,572 citations. After separating out duplicate citations, the total number was 19,937. Using a random number generator, the de-duplicated list of citations was re-ordered in order to select a random sample of 400, which affords a confidence level of 95% and a confidence interval of 5. The first step in analysis was to characterize each citation according to format, publication date, and language. Secondly, the author searched for all citations in the sample in the 6 different search platforms listed above. The primary question for each database included in the study was how comprehensively it represented the population of AHR citations, as represented by the random sample selected for this study. In order for a given citation to count as present in a particular database, it had to be represented in the format in which it was cited. For example, if a search for a cited book turned up only a dissertation, with the same author and very similar title, the analysis found that the citation was not present. For book chapters cited with authors and titles, it was not necessary for chapters to have their own records in order to be counted as present but it was necessary for them to be discernible among search results as chapters, such as in a table of contents listing. In order to expedite the search process, the author searched Historical Abstracts and America: History and Life simultaneously on the EBSCO platform. For all of the platforms except Google Scholar, the author performed advanced searches, entering both title and author information for each citation. All searching took place between February and May of 2017. The results presented here reflect the content available to search in each platform at the time of investigation.
  • Literature search strategies for "Substance Use Education in Schools of Nursing: A Systematic Review of the Literature"

    Work
    Creator: MacEachern, Mark P
    Description: The dataset represents the complete, reproducible search strategies for all literature databases searched during the systematic review. The Endnote file and the Endnote import files contain all citations considered for inclusion in the review.
  • Large-eddy simulation (LES) model simulations

    Work
    Creator: Li, Yang and Steiner, Allison
    Description: Case 2 of Li et al. (2016) LES simulations for the DISCOVER-AQ 11 campaign, including three different grid resolutions (96, 197 and 320 grid cell resolutions), plus simulations at the 192 grid resolution with and without aqueous chemistry
  • Large-eddy simulation of BVOC during the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ

    Work
    Creator: Li, Yang and Steiner, Allison
    Description: Case 1: A fair weather condition; Case 2: A convective event; Case 3: A polluted event with high temperature and convection
  • The ethical and professional use of social media in surgery - A review of the literature

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    Creator: Bennett, Katelyn G MD, Preminger, Aviva MD, MacEachern, Mark P MLIS, Berlin, Nicolas MD, and Vercler, Christian J MD
    Description: The dataset includes the reproducible search strategies for all literature databases searched during the review, the key articles used to generate relevant search terms and test the effectiveness of the searches, the Endnote library that has all citations considered for inclusion, a flow chart describing the screening process, and the screening forms used for inclusion and exclusion.
  • Understanding Ecosystem Services Adoption by Natural Resource Managers and Research Ecologists: Survey Data

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    Creator: Engel, Daniel D. , Evans, Mary Anne, Low, Bobbi S., and Schaeffer, Jeff
    Description: This dataset was compiled as an attempt to understand how natural resource managers and research ecologists in the Great Lakes region integrate the ecosystem services (ES) paradigm into their work. The following text is the adapted abstract from a thesis associated with this data. Ecosystem services, or the benefits people obtain from ecosystems, have gained much momentum in natural resource management in recent decades as a relatively comprehensive approach to provide quantitative tools for improving decision-making and policy design. However, to date we know little about whether and how natural resource practitioners, from natural resource managers to research ecologists (hereafter managers and ecologist respectively), have adopted the ES paradigm into their respective work. Here, we addressed this knowledge gap by asking managers and ecologists about whether and how they have adopted the ES paradigm into their respective work. First, we surveyed federal, state, provincial and tribal managers in the Great Lakes region about their perception and use of ES as well as the relevance of specific services to their work. Although results indicate that fewer than 31% of the managers said they currently consider economic values of ES, 79% of managers said they would use economic information on ES if they had access to it. Additionally, managers reported that ES-related information was generally inadequate for their resource management needs. We also assessed managers by dividing them into identifiable groups (e.g. managers working in different types of government agencies or administrative levels) to evaluate differential ES integration. Overall, results suggest a desire among managers to transition from considering ES concepts in their management practices to quantifying economic metrics, indicating a need for practical and accessible valuation techniques. Due to a sample of opportunity at the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC), we also evaluated GLSC research ecologists’ integration of the ES paradigm because they play an important role by contributing requisite ecological knowledge for ES models. Managers and ecologists almost unanimously agreed that it was appropriate to consider ES in resource management and also showed convergence on the high priority ES. However, ecologists appeared to overestimate the adequacy of ES-related information they provide as managers reported the information was inadequate for their needs. This divergence may reflect an underrepresentation of ecological economists in this system who can aid in translating ecological models into estimates of human well-being. As a note, both CSV files in this dataset have two tabs: 1) the raw data, and 2) an index describing each column. The dataset for the research ecologists has had some data removed as it could be considered personally identifiable information due to the small sample size in that population. The surveys associated with both datasets have also been included in PDF format. Curation Notes: Three files were added to the data set on Dec 21, 2017. Two csv files: "Ecosystem services and Research Ecologists - Data Index.csv" and "Ecosystem services and Research Managers - Data Index.csv" and one text file: "Ecosystem Services Adoption Readme.txt". The file names of the original four files were altered to replace an ampersand with the word "and".