Capturing Flow: Stormwater Governance and Water Resource Development in Chicago and Los Angeles.

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dc.contributor.author Cousins, Joshua James
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-13T13:53:26Z
dc.date.available NO_RESTRICTION
dc.date.available 2016-09-13T13:53:26Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.date.submitted 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/133397
dc.description.abstract This dissertation focuses on the factors that shape how water resource managers shape the flow, or metabolism, of water through cities. Through a comparative and mixed-method approach drawing on archival research, key informant interviews, Q-methodology, and spatial analysis, this dissertation presents a framework for understanding the social and material factors that shape urban water flows. Focusing on Chicago and Los Angeles, the study concentrates on the methods and approaches water resource managers use to control volumes of water and achieve political goals. The results reveal the shortcomings of overly technical approaches to solve water resource problems, which are enmeshed within a spatially complex set of socio-political and historical processes. I also reveal the multiple ways water resource managers approach water challenges and come to particular ways of understanding solutions for them. I identify seven perspectives on stormwater governance: Market Skeptic, Hydro-managerial, Hydro-rationalist, Hydro-reformist, Hydro-pragmatist, Market Technocrat, Regulatory and Administrative Technocrat, Institutional Interventionist, Infrastructural Interventionist. It is shown that these viewpoints are shaped through multiple institutional and bureaucratic practices. Some viewpoints are geographically and idiosyncratically defined, while others transcend geographical and institutional specificity. Whether invoking stormwater as a “new” resource to achieve water quality and quantity goals, or negotiating the role of new technologies and financial mechanisms to control the flow of water, this dissertation reveals the commonalities across different ways of understanding water in order to offer more acceptable policies.
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject Environmental governance and decision-making
dc.subject Stormwater
dc.subject Political Ecology
dc.subject Industrial Ecology
dc.subject Urban Metabolism
dc.title Capturing Flow: Stormwater Governance and Water Resource Development in Chicago and Los Angeles.
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.thesisdegreename PhD
dc.description.thesisdegreediscipline Natural Resources and Environment
dc.description.thesisdegreegrantor University of Michigan, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies
dc.contributor.committeemember Newell, Josh
dc.contributor.committeemember Campbell, Scott D.
dc.contributor.committeemember Lemos, Maria Carmen De Mello
dc.contributor.committeemember Butt, Bilal
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Geography and Maps
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Social Sciences (General)
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Urban Planning
dc.subject.hlbtoplevel Social Sciences
dc.description.bitstreamurl http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/133397/1/jojaco_1.pdf
dc.owningcollname Dissertations and Theses (Ph.D. and Master's)
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