Humanism in telemedicine: Connecting through virtual visits during the COVID-19 pandemic

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dc.contributor.author Shankar, Megha
dc.contributor.author Fischer, Meredith
dc.contributor.author Brown-Johnson, Cati G.
dc.contributor.author Safaeinili, Nadia
dc.contributor.author Haverfield, Marie C,
dc.contributor.author Shaw, Jonathan G,
dc.contributor.author Verghese, Abraham
dc.contributor.author Zulman, Donna M.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-04-12T16:02:41Z
dc.date.available 2020-04-12T16:02:41Z
dc.date.issued 2020-04-12
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/154738
dc.description.abstract The COVID-19 pandemic is spurring the massive deployment of telemedicine to prevent risk of infection and address healthcare workforce demands. In primary care, many visits have shifted from in-person to telemedicine, introducing a potential barrier to the human connection that is central to clinical care. We adapted existing frameworks that seek to foster humanism in clinical care-the Four Habits Model and Presence 5-to the virtual care context. Reconceptualizing these frameworks to video visits in particular yields strategies for four phases of the visit - (1) Before the Visit: Set up for Success, (2) Beginning the Visit: Establish a Connection, (3) Throughout the Visit: Invest in the Relationship and the Patient's Story, and (4) Completing the Visit: End on a Meaningful Note. Adopting explicit humanistic practices can help clinicians foster meaningful connections with patients through video visits amidst this challenging pandemic and in the future as telemedicine becomes more widely integrated into clinical care. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship This study was supported by a grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (#6382; PIs Donna Zulman and Abraham Verghese). Megha Shankar is supported by a VA Office of Academic Affairs Advanced Fellowship in Health Services Research. The views expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, or Stanford University School of Medicine. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Annals of Family Medicine, COVID Collection en_US
dc.subject COVID-19, telemedicine, patient-physician relationship, patient-physician communication, virtual care, video visit, humanism en_US
dc.title Humanism in telemedicine: Connecting through virtual visits during the COVID-19 pandemic en_US
dc.type Preprint en_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Epidemiology
dc.subject.hlbtoplevel Health Sciences
dc.contributor.affiliationum Annals of Family Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother VA Palo Alto Health Care System Center for Innovation to Implementation (Ci2i), Menlo Park, California en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Stanford University Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research (PCOR) and Center for Health Policy (CHP), Stanford, California en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Division of Primary Care and Population Health, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Department of Communication Studies, San Jose State University, San Jose, California en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampus Ann Arbor en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurl https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/154738/1/Shankar article file.pdf
dc.description.filedescription Description of Shankar article file.pdf : Main article
dc.owningcollname COVID-19: Annals of Family Medicine
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