The analysis of perception via preference: A strategy for studying how the environment is experienced

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dc.contributor.author Kaplan, Rachel en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2006-04-07T19:01:33Z
dc.date.available 2006-04-07T19:01:33Z
dc.date.issued 1985-08 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Kaplan, Rachel (1985/08)."The analysis of perception via preference: A strategy for studying how the environment is experienced." Landscape and Planning 12(2): 161-176. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/25604> en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6X2T-47KG57N-G/2/1fb5eae3bb112e3300b7e5dc89931c1b en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/25604
dc.description.abstract Systematic approaches to the management of the visual resource tend to be based on categorizations, and on assumptions of what is valued or preferred. Underlying these distinctions is an implicit view of the perception of the environment. The expert's perceptions, however, may be quite different from the perceptions of those who lack specialized training. While direct questioning regarding environmental perception is unlikely to be fruitful, it has been shown that the use of preference reactions to photographic material is a highly effective procedure for deriving salient perceptual categories. A series of studies focusing on diverse land uses and land covers has generated considerable insight into the way the environment is experienced by the general public. It is safe to say that these empirical results neither match the categories that are the provinces of professional groups assigned with the management of the visual resource, nor do they correspond directly to the attributes assumed to be important in preference. Rather, environmental perception is finely tuned in certain kinds of environments and much less differentiated in others. Equally preferred scenes may fit distinctly different categories. The neglect of the public's categorizations and valuation may lead to approaches that are apparently rational and systematic, but inconsistent with such prevailing perceptions. en_US
dc.format.extent 1299748 bytes
dc.format.extent 3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype text/plain
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.title The analysis of perception via preference: A strategy for studying how the environment is experienced en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.rights.robots IndexNoFollow en_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Urban Planning en_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevel Social Sciences en_US
dc.description.peerreviewed Peer Reviewed en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum School of Natural Resources, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, U.S.A. en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurl http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/25604/1/0000151.pdf en_US
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0304-3924(85)90058-9 en_US
dc.identifier.source Landscape and Planning en_US
dc.identifier.orcid 0000-0003-2049-3503
dc.identifier.name-orcid Kaplan, Rachel; 0000-0003-2049-3503 en_US
dc.owningcollname Interdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed
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