Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKessler, Ronald C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAbelson, Jamie M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDemler, Olgaen_US
dc.contributor.authorEscobar, Javier I.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGibbon, Miriamen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuyer, Margaret E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHowes, Mary J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJin, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorVega, William A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWalters, Ellen E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Philipen_US
dc.contributor.authorZaslavsky, Alanen_US
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Huien_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-04-18T20:52:40Z
dc.date.available2006-04-18T20:52:40Z
dc.date.issued2004-06en_US
dc.identifier.citationKessler, Ronald C.; Abelson, Jamie; Demler, Olga; Escobar, Javier I.; Gibbon, Miriam; Guyer, Margaret E.; Howes, Mary J.; Jin, Robert; Vega, William A.; Walters, Ellen E.; Wang, Philip; Zaslavsky, Alan; Zheng, Hui (2004)."Clinical calibration of DSM-IV diagnoses in the World Mental Health (WMH) version of the World Health Organization (WHO) Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI)." International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research 13(2): 122-139. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/34223>en_US
dc.identifier.issn1049-8931en_US
dc.identifier.issn1234-988Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/34223
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=15297907&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractAn overview is presented of the rationale, design, and analysis plan for the WMH-CIDI clinical calibration studies. As no clinical gold standard assessment is available for the DSM-IV disorders assessed in the WMH-CIDI, we adopted the goal of calibration rather than validation; that is, we asked whether WMH-CIDI diagnoses are ‘consistent’ with diagnoses based on a state-of-the-art clinical research diagnostic interview (SCID; Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV) rather than whether they are ‘correct’. Consistency is evaluated both at the aggregate level (consistency of WMH-CIDI and SCID prevalence estimates) and at the individual level (consistency of WMH-CIDI and SCID diagnostic classifications). Although conventional statistics (sensitivity, specificity, Cohen's Κ) are used to describe diagnostic consistency, an argument is made for considering the area under the receiver operator curve (AUC) to be a more useful general-purpose measure of consistency. In addition, more detailed analyses are used to evaluate consistency on a substantive level. These analyses begin by estimating prediction equations in a clinical calibration subsample, with WMH-CIDI symptom-level data used to predict SCID diagnoses, and using the coefficients from these equations to assign predicted probabilities of SCID diagnoses to each respondent in the remainder of the sample. Substantive analyses then investigate whether estimates of prevalence and associations when based on WMH-CIDI diagnoses are consistent with those based on predicted SCID diagnoses. Multiple imputation is used to adjust estimated standard errors for the imprecision introduced by SCID diagnoses being imputed under a model rather than measured directly. A brief illustration of this approach is presented in comparing the precision of SCID and predicted SCID estimates of prevalence and correlates under varying sample designs. Copyright © 2004 Whurr Publishers Ltd.en_US
dc.format.extent345532 bytes
dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.subject.otherLife and Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.titleClinical calibration of DSM-IV diagnoses in the World Mental Health (WMH) version of the World Health Organization (WHO) Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.robotsIndexNoFollowen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPsychiatryen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPsychiatryen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumInstitute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USA ; Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, 180 Longwood Avenue, Boston MA, USA 02115.en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherUniversity of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick NJ, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherNew York State Psychiatric Institute, New York City NY, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherUniversity of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick NJ, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USAen_US
dc.identifier.pmid15297907en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/34223/1/169_ftp.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mpr.169en_US
dc.identifier.sourceInternational Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Researchen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


Files in this item

Show simple item record