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Comparative efficacy of treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder: a meta-analysis

dc.contributor.authorVan Etten, Michelle L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Stevenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-04-19T14:15:39Z
dc.date.available2006-04-19T14:15:39Z
dc.date.issued1998-09en_US
dc.identifier.citationVan Etten, Michelle L.; Taylor, Steven (1998)."Comparative efficacy of treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder: a meta-analysis." Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy 5(3): 126-144. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/35192>en_US
dc.identifier.issn1063-3995en_US
dc.identifier.issn1099-0879en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/35192
dc.description.abstractA meta-analysis was conducted on 61 treatment outcome trials for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Conditions included drug therapies (TCAs, carbamazepine, MAOIs, SSRIs, and BDZs), psychological therapies (behaviour therapy, Eye-Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), relaxation training, hypnotherapy, and dynamic therapy), and control conditions (pill placebo, wait-list controls, supportive psychotherapies, and non-saccade EMDR control). Psychological therapies had significantly lower drop-out rates than pharmacotherapies (14% versus 32%), with attrition being uniformly low across all psychological therapies. In terms of symptom reduction, psychological therapies were more effective than drug therapies, and both were more effective than controls. Among the drug therapies, the SSRIs and carbamazepine had the greatest effect sizes, although the latter was based upon a single trial. Among the psychological therapies, behaviour therapy and EMDR were most effective, and generally equally so. The most effective psychological therapies and drug therapies were generally equally effective. Differences across treatment conditions were generally evident across symptom domains, with little matching of symptom domain to treatment type. However, SSRIs had some advantage over psychological therapies in treating depression. Follow-up results were not available for most treatments, but available data indicates that treatment effects for behaviour therapy and EMDR are maintained at 15-week follow-up. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.format.extent182276 bytes
dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.subject.otherPsychologyen_US
dc.titleComparative efficacy of treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder: a meta-analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.robotsIndexNoFollowen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPsychiatryen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada ; Department of Psychiatry, 2255 Westbrook Mall, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada, V6T 2A1.en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/35192/1/153_ftp.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1099-0879(199809)5:3<126::AID-CPP153>3.0.CO;2-Hen_US
dc.identifier.sourceClinical Psychology & Psychotherapyen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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