The urban built environment and overdose mortality in New York City neighborhoods

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Hembree, C. en_US
dc.contributor.author Galea, Sandro en_US
dc.contributor.author Ahern, Jennifer en_US
dc.contributor.author Tracy, Melissa en_US
dc.contributor.author Markham Piper, T. en_US
dc.contributor.author Miller, J. en_US
dc.contributor.author Vlahov, David en_US
dc.contributor.author Tardiff, Kenneth J. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2006-07-27T18:54:33Z
dc.date.available 2006-07-27T18:54:33Z
dc.date.issued 2005 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/40318
dc.description.abstract Accidental drug overdose continues to be a substantial cause of mortality for drug users. Characteristics of the neighborhood built environment may be important determinants of the likelihood of drug overdose mortality independent of individual-level factors. Using data from the New York City Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, we conducted a multilevel case control study using data on accidental overdose deaths as cases and non-overdose accidental deaths as controls. We used archival data from the New York City Housing and Vacancy Survey and the Mayor’s Office of Operations to assess characteristics of neighborhood external (e.g. dilapidation of buildings) and internal (e.g. quality of utilities in houses) built environment. Multilevel analyses were used to assess the relations between the neighborhood built environment and the likelihood of overdose death. Six out of the eight characteristics of the external environment studied and three out of the six characteristics of the internal environment studied were significantly associated with the likelihood of fatal drug overdose in multilevel models after adjusting for individuallevel (age, race, sex) and neighborhood-level (income, drug use) variables. Deterioration of the built environment, particularly the external environment, is associated with an increased likelihood of fatal accidental drug overdose. Disinvestment in social resources, psychosocial stressors, neighborhood differences in response to a witnessed overdose, and differences in vulnerability to the adverse consequences of drug use in different neighborhoods may explain the observed associations. en_US
dc.format.extent 1931 bytes
dc.format.extent 283429 bytes
dc.format.mimetype text/plain
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.title The urban built environment and overdose mortality in New York City neighborhoods en_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Public Health en_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevel Health Sciences en_US
dc.description.peerreviewed Peer Reviewed
dc.contributor.affiliationum Epidemiology, Department of en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampus Ann Arbor en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurl http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/40318/2/Hembree_The Urban Built Environment and Overdose_2005.PDF en_US
dc.owningcollname Epidemiology, Department of (SPH)
 Show simple item record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)


Search Deep Blue

Advanced Search

Browse by

My Account

Information

Coming Soon


MLibrary logo