Meteors: A Delivery Mechanism of Organic Matter to the Early Earth

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dc.contributor.author Jenniskens, Peter en_US
dc.contributor.author Wilson, Mike A. en_US
dc.contributor.author Packan, Dennis en_US
dc.contributor.author Laux, Christophe O. en_US
dc.contributor.author Krüger, Charles H. en_US
dc.contributor.author Boyd, Iain D. en_US
dc.contributor.author Popova, Olga P. en_US
dc.contributor.author Fonda, Mark en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2006-09-08T21:14:28Z
dc.date.available 2006-09-08T21:14:28Z
dc.date.issued 1998-01 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Jenniskens, Peter; Wilson, Mike A.; Packan, Dennis; Laux, Christophe O.; Krüger, Charles H.; Boyd, Iain D.; Popova, Olga P.; Fonda, Mark; (1998). "Meteors: A Delivery Mechanism of Organic Matter to the Early Earth." Earth, Moon, and Planets 82-83(0): 57-70. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/43257> en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0167-9295 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1573-0794 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/43257
dc.description.abstract All potential exogenous pre-biotic matter arrived to Earth by ways of our atmosphere, where much material was ablated during a luminous phase called "meteors" in rarefied flows of high (up to 270) Mach number. The recent Leonid showers offered a first glimpse into the clusive physical conditions of the ablation process and atmospheric chemistry associated with high-speed meteors. Molecular emissions were detected that trace a meteor's brilliant light to a 4,300 K warm wake rather than to the meteor's head. A new theoretical approach using the direct simulation by Monte Carlo technique identified the source-region and demonstrated that the ablation process is critical in the heating of the meteor's wake. In the head of the meteor, organic carbon appears to survive flash heating and rapid cooling. The temperatures in the wake of the meteor are just right for dissociation of CO and the formation of more complex organic compounds. The resulting materials could account for the bulk of pre-biotic organic carbon on the early Earth at the time of the origin of life. en_US
dc.format.extent 260192 bytes
dc.format.extent 3115 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype text/plain
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher Kluwer Academic Publishers; Springer Science+Business Media en_US
dc.subject.other Physics en_US
dc.subject.other Geophysics/Geodesy en_US
dc.subject.other Planetology en_US
dc.subject.other Remote Sensing/Photogrammetry en_US
dc.subject.other Astrophysics en_US
dc.title Meteors: A Delivery Mechanism of Organic Matter to the Early Earth en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences en_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevel Science en_US
dc.description.peerreviewed Peer Reviewed en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, 3012 Francois-Xavier Bagnoud Building, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2140 en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother NASA/Ames Research Center, Mail Stop 239-4, Moffett Field, CA, 94035 en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother NASA/Ames Research Center, Mail Stop 239-4, Moffett Field, CA, 94035 en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory, Stanford University, Building 520, Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford, CA, 94305-3032 en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory, Stanford University, Building 520, Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford, CA, 94305-3032 en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory, Stanford University, Building 520, Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford, CA, 94305-3032 en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Institute for Dynamics of Geospheres RAS, Leninsky prospekt 38, bld.6, Moscow, 117979, Russia en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother NASA/Ames Research Center, Mail Stop 239-4, Moffett Field, CA, 94035 en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampus Ann Arbor en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurl http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/43257/1/11038_2004_Article_310535.pdf en_US
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1017017728166 en_US
dc.identifier.source Earth, Moon, and Planets en_US
dc.owningcollname Interdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed
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