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Convergence in the physical appearance of spouses

dc.contributor.authorAdelmann, Pamela K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Sheila T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNiedenthal, Paula M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZajonc, Robert B.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-11T15:58:15Z
dc.date.available2006-09-11T15:58:15Z
dc.date.issued1987-12en_US
dc.identifier.citationZajonc, R. B.; Adelmann, Pamela K.; Murphy, Sheila T.; Niedenthal, Paula M.; (1987). "Convergence in the physical appearance of spouses." Motivation and Emotion 11(4): 335-346. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/45361>en_US
dc.identifier.issn1573-6644en_US
dc.identifier.issn0146-7239en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/45361
dc.description.abstractThis study attempted to determine whether people who live with each other for a long period of time grow physically similar in their facial features. Photographs of couples when they were first married and 25 years later were judged for physical similarity and for the likelihood that they were married. The results showed that there is indeed an increase in apparent similarity after 25 years of cohabitation. Moreover, increase in resemblance was associated with greater reported marital happiness. Among the explanations of this phenomenon that were examined, one based on a theory of emotional efference emerged as promising. This theory proposes that emotional processes produce vascular changes that are, in part, regulated by facial musculature. The facial muscles are said to act as ligatures on veins and arteries, and they thereby are able to divert blood from, or direct blood to, the brain. An implication of the vascular theory of emotional efference is that habitual use of facial musculature may permanently affect the physical features of the face. The implication holds further that two people who live with each other for a longer period of time, by virtue of repeated empathic mimicry, would grow physically similar in their facial features. Kin resemblance, therefore, may not be simply a matter of common genes but also a matter of prolonged social contact.en_US
dc.format.extent924514 bytes
dc.format.extent3115 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherKluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers; Plenum Publishing Corporation ; Springer Science+Business Mediaen_US
dc.subject.otherClinical Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.otherPsychology of Personalityen_US
dc.subject.otherDevelopmental Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.otherSocial Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.otherPsychologyen_US
dc.titleConvergence in the physical appearance of spousesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumResearch Center for Group Dynamics, The University of Michigan, 48106, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumResearch Center for Group Dynamics, The University of Michigan, 48106, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumResearch Center for Group Dynamics, The University of Michigan, 48106, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumResearch Center for Group Dynamics, The University of Michigan, 48106, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/45361/1/11031_2004_Article_BF00992848.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00992848en_US
dc.identifier.sourceMotivation and Emotionen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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