Microbial community utilization of recalcitrant and simple carbon compounds: impact of oak-woodland plant communities

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dc.contributor.author Waldrop, Mark P. en_US
dc.contributor.author Firestone, Mary K. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2006-09-11T19:17:34Z
dc.date.available 2006-09-11T19:17:34Z
dc.date.issued 2004-01 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Waldrop, Mark P.; Firestone, Mary K.; (2004). "Microbial community utilization of recalcitrant and simple carbon compounds: impact of oak-woodland plant communities." Oecologia 138(2): 275-284. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47700> en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1432-1939 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0029-8549 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47700
dc.identifier.uri http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=14614618&dopt=citation en_US
dc.description.abstract Little is known about how the structure of microbial communities impacts carbon cycling or how soil microbial community composition mediates plant effects on C-decomposition processes. We examined the degradation of four 13 C-labeled compounds (starch, xylose, vanillin, and pine litter), quantified rates of associated enzyme activities, and identified microbial groups utilizing the 13 C-labeled substrates in soils under oaks and in adjacent open grasslands. By quantifying increases in non- 13 C-labeled carbon in microbial biomarkers, we were also able to identify functional groups responsible for the metabolism of indigenous soil organic matter. Although microbial community composition differed between oak and grassland soils, the microbial groups responsible for starch, xylose, and vanillin degradation, as defined by 13 C-PLFA, did not differ significantly between oak and grassland soils. Microbial groups responsible for pine litter and SOM-C degradation did differ between the two soils. Enhanced degradation of SOM resulting from substrate addition (priming) was greater in grassland soils, particularly in response to pine litter addition; under these conditions, fungal and Gram + biomarkers showed more incorporation of SOM-C than did Gram – biomarkers. In contrast, the oak soil microbial community primarily incorporated C from the added substrates. More 13 C (from both simple and recalcitrant sources) was incorporated into the Gram – biomarkers than Gram + biomarkers despite the fact that the Gram + group generally comprised a greater portion of the bacterial biomass than did markers for the Gram – group. These experiments begin to identify components of the soil microbial community responsible for decomposition of different types of C-substrates. The results demonstrate that the presence of distinctly different plant communities did not alter the microbial community profile responsible for decomposition of relatively labile C-substrates but did alter the profiles of microbial communities responsible for decomposition of the more recalcitrant substrates, pine litter and indigenous soil organic matter. en_US
dc.format.extent 219341 bytes
dc.format.extent 3115 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype text/plain
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher Springer-Verlag en_US
dc.subject.other Enzyme Activities en_US
dc.subject.other Soil Carbon Cycling en_US
dc.subject.other 13 C-phospholipid Fatty Acid Analysis en_US
dc.subject.other LifeSciences en_US
dc.subject.other Microbial Community Composition en_US
dc.title Microbial community utilization of recalcitrant and simple carbon compounds: impact of oak-woodland plant communities en_US
dc.type Ecosystem Ecology en_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Natural Resources and Environment en_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology en_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Ecology and Evolutionary Biology en_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevel Health Sciences en_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevel Science en_US
dc.description.peerreviewed Peer Reviewed en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, 151 Hilgard Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA; School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, 430 E. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, 151 Hilgard Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampus Ann Arbor en_US
dc.identifier.pmid 14614618 en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurl http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/47700/1/442_2003_Article_1419.pdf en_US
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-003-1419-9 en_US
dc.identifier.source Oecologia en_US
dc.owningcollname Interdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed
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