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dc.contributor.authorBarbehenn, Raymond V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Zhongen_US
dc.contributor.authorKarowe, David N.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-11T19:17:50Z
dc.date.available2006-09-11T19:17:50Z
dc.date.issued2004-06en_US
dc.identifier.citationBarbehenn, Raymond V.; Karowe, David N.; Chen, Zhong; (2004). "Performance of a generalist grasshopper on a C 3 and a C 4 grass: compensation for the effects of elevated CO 2 on plant nutritional quality." Oecologia 140(1): 96-103. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47704>en_US
dc.identifier.issn1432-1939en_US
dc.identifier.issn0029-8549en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47704
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=15069636&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractThe increasing CO 2 concentration in Earth’s atmosphere is expected to cause a greater decline in the nutritional quality of C 3 than C 4 plants. As a compensatory response, herbivorous insects may increase their feeding disproportionately on C 3 plants. These hypotheses were tested by growing the grasses Lolium multiflorum C 3 ) and Bouteloua curtipendula C 4 ) at ambient (370 ppm) and elevated (740 ppm) CO 2 levels in open top chambers in the field, and comparing the growth and digestive efficiencies of the generalist grasshopper Melanoplus sanguinipes on each of the four plant × CO 2 treatment combinations. As expected, the nutritional quality of the C 3 grass declined to a greater extent than did that of the C 4 grass at elevated CO 2 ; protein levels declined in the C 3 grass, while levels of carbohydrates (sugar, fructan and starch) increased. However, M. sanguinipes did not significantly increase its consumption rate to compensate for the lower nutritional quality of the C 3 grass grown under elevated CO 2 . Instead, these grasshoppers appear to use post-ingestive mechanisms to maintain their growth rates on the C 3 grass under elevated CO 2 . Consumption rates of the C 3 and C 4 grasses were also similar, demonstrating a lack of compensatory feeding on the C 4 grass. We also examined the relative efficiencies of nutrient utilization from a C 3 and C 4 grass by M. sanguinipes to test the basis for the C 4 plant avoidance hypothesis. Contrary to this hypothesis, neither protein nor sugar was digested with a lower efficiency from the C 4 grass than from the C 3 grass. A novel finding of this study is that fructan, a potentially large carbohydrate source in C 3 grasses, is utilized by grasshoppers. Based on the higher nutrient levels in the C 3 grass and the better growth performance of M. sanguinipes on this grass at both CO 2 levels, we conclude that C 3 grasses are likely to remain better host plants than C 4 grasses in future CO 2 conditions.en_US
dc.format.extent150954 bytes
dc.format.extent3115 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlagen_US
dc.subject.otherLifeSciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherMelanoplus Sanguinipes (Grasshopper)en_US
dc.subject.otherNutrienten_US
dc.subject.otherBouteloua Curtipendula C 4 Grass)en_US
dc.subject.otherDigestionen_US
dc.subject.otherLolium Multiflorum C 3 Grass)en_US
dc.titlePerformance of a generalist grasshopper on a C 3 and a C 4 grass: compensation for the effects of elevated CO 2 on plant nutritional qualityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resources and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelMolecular, Cellular and Developmental Biologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartments of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1048, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Biological Sciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5410, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherSchool of Forestry, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ 86011-5018, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.identifier.pmid15069636en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/47704/1/442_2004_Article_1555.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-004-1555-xen_US
dc.identifier.sourceOecologiaen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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