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Sociality of Columbian ground squirrels in relation to their seasonal energy intake

dc.contributor.authorBelovsky, Gary E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRitchie, Mark E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-11T19:23:32Z
dc.date.available2006-09-11T19:23:32Z
dc.date.issued1990-07en_US
dc.identifier.citationRitchie, Mark E.; Belovsky, Gary E.; (1990). "Sociality of Columbian ground squirrels in relation to their seasonal energy intake." Oecologia 83(4): 495-503. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47787>en_US
dc.identifier.issn1432-1939en_US
dc.identifier.issn0029-8549en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47787
dc.description.abstractSeasonal energy intake was estimated for ten populations of Columbian ground squirrels ( Spermophilus columbianus ) in northwestern Montana. We calculated daily energy intake for an average ground squirrel in each population using measurements of feeding time, consumption rates of different vegetation types (monocots vs. dicots), and the proportion of monocots and dicots in the diet. These daily energy intakes were multiplied by the length of the plant growing season for each population to estimate seasonal energy intake, i.e. over the ground squirrel active season. Amicable interaction rates measured for each population varied with seasonal energy intake, but not with environmental heterogeneity, sex ratio, or the ratio of adults to juveniles. In particular, amicable interactions among adult-juvenile and juvenile-juvenile pairs increased as seasonal energy intake decreased. The proportion of females breeding as yearlings increased as seasonal energy intake increased. This suggests that “harsh” environments reduce the energy available for juvenile growth and development, leading to delayed dispersal and age at first reproduction. These responses may promote the formation of kin groups and increased amicable interactions within those groups. The length of the plant growing season may determine environmental “harshness” across elevational gradients, but at a particular elevation, “harshness” may depend on factors determining daily food intake.en_US
dc.format.extent915227 bytes
dc.format.extent3115 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlagen_US
dc.subject.otherAmicable Interactionsen_US
dc.subject.otherEcologyen_US
dc.subject.otherLife Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherSocial Behavioren_US
dc.subject.otherGround Squirrelsen_US
dc.subject.otherPlant Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherEnergy Intakeen_US
dc.subject.otherPlant Growing Seasonen_US
dc.titleSociality of Columbian ground squirrels in relation to their seasonal energy intakeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resources and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelMolecular, Cellular and Developmental Biologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Biology and School of Natural Resources, University of Michigan, 48109, Ann Arbor, MI, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumSchool of Natural Resources, University of Michigan, 48109, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, 55455, Minneapolis, MN, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/47787/1/442_2004_Article_BF00317200.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00317200en_US
dc.identifier.sourceOecologiaen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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