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Starvation resistance of gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae): tradeoffs among growth, body size, and survival

dc.contributor.authorStockhoff, Brian A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-11T19:23:53Z
dc.date.available2006-09-11T19:23:53Z
dc.date.issued1991-11en_US
dc.identifier.citationStockhoff, Brian A.; (1991). "Starvation resistance of gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae): tradeoffs among growth, body size, and survival." Oecologia 88(3): 422-429. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47792>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0029-8549en_US
dc.identifier.issn1432-1939en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47792
dc.description.abstractSurvival and body composition of starving gypsy moth larvae initially reared on aspen foliage or artificial diet differeing in nitrogen (N) and carbohydrate concentration were examined under laboratory conditions. Diet nitrogen concentration strongly affected starvation resistance and body composition, but diet carbohydrate content had no effects on these. Within any single diet treatment, greater body mass afforded greater resistance to starvation. However, starving larvae reared on 1.5% N diet survived nearly three days longer than larvae reared on 3.5% N diet. Larvae reared on artificial diet survived longer than larvae reared on aspen. Differences in survival of larvae reared on artificial diet with low and high nitrogen concentrations could not be attributed to variation in respiration rates, but were associated with differences in body composition. Although percentage lipid in larvae was unaffected by diet nitrogen concentration, larvae reared on 1.5% N diet had a higher percentage carbohydrate and lower percentage protein in their bodies prior to starvation than larvae reared on 3.5% N diet. Hence, larger energy reserves of larvae reared on low nitrogen diet may have contributed to their greater starvation resistance. Whereas survival under food stress was lower for larvae reared on high N diets, growth rates and pupal weights were higher, suggesting a tradeoff between rapid growth and survival. Larger body size does not necessarily reflect larger energy reserves, and, in fact, larger body size accured via greater protein accumulation may be at the expense of energy reserves. Large, fast-growing larvae may be more fit when food is abundant, but this advantage may be severely diminished under food stress. The potential ecological and evolutionary implications of a growth/survival tradeoff are discussed.en_US
dc.format.extent965300 bytes
dc.format.extent3115 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlagen_US
dc.subject.otherSurvivalen_US
dc.subject.otherStarvationen_US
dc.subject.otherNitrogenen_US
dc.subject.otherPlant Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherLymantria Disparen_US
dc.subject.otherFitness Tradeoffen_US
dc.subject.otherEcologyen_US
dc.subject.otherLife Sciencesen_US
dc.titleStarvation resistance of gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae): tradeoffs among growth, body size, and survivalen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resources and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelMolecular, Cellular and Developmental Biologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Biology, University of Michigan, 48109-1048, Ann Arbor, MI, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/47792/1/442_2004_Article_BF00317588.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00317588en_US
dc.identifier.sourceOecologiaen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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