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Nutritional indices in the gypsy moth ( Lymantria dispar (L.)) under field conditions and host switching situations

dc.contributor.authorWitter, John A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStoyenoff, J. L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMontgomery, M. E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-11T19:24:38Z
dc.date.available2006-09-11T19:24:38Z
dc.date.issued1994-03en_US
dc.identifier.citationStoyenoff, J. L.; Witter, J. A.; Montgomery, M. E.; (1994). "Nutritional indices in the gypsy moth ( Lymantria dispar (L.)) under field conditions and host switching situations." Oecologia 97(2): 158-170. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47803>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0029-8549en_US
dc.identifier.issn1432-1939en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47803
dc.description.abstractA large proportion of gypsy moths ( Lymantria dispar (L.)) are likely to experience multiple species diets in the field due to natural wandering and host switching which occurs with these insects. Nutritional indices in fourth and fifth instar gypsy moth larvae were studied in the field for insects that were switched to a second host species when they were fourth instars. The tree species used as hosts were northern pin oak ( Quercus ellipsoidalis E. J. Hill), white oak ( Q. alba L.), big-tooth aspen ( Populus grandidentata Michx.), and trembling aspen ( P. tremuloides Michx.). Conclusions of this study include: 1) Insects which fed before the host switch on northern pin oak performed better after the host switch than did insects with other types of early dietary experience. While the northern pin oak-started insects had very low relative food consumption rates on their second host species immediately after the switch, one instar later they had the highest ranked consumption rates. During both instars they had the second highest efficiencies of converting ingested and digested food to body mass. High food consumption rates and relatively high efficiency of food conversion helped these insects to obtain the highest ranked mean relative growth rates in the fifth instar compared to the relative growth rates obtained by insects from any of the other first host species. 2) Among the four host species examined, a second host of trembling aspen was most advantageous for the insects. Feeding on this species after the switch led to higher larval weights and higher relative growth rates for insects than did any of the other second host species. The insects on trembling aspen attained excellent growth despite only mediocre to low food conversion efficiencies. The low efficiencies were offset by high relative food consumption rates. 3) Low food consumption rates often tend to be paired with high efficiency of conversion and vice versa. 4) There is no discernable tendency for the first plant species eaten to cause long-term inductions which affect the ability of gypsy moths to utilize subsequent host plants. Insects did not tend to consume more, grow faster, or be more efficient if their second host plant was either the same as their rearing plant or congeneric to it. Methods are delineated which allow values of nutritional indices to be obtained for insects on intact host plants under field conditions. These methods are useful for the purpose of answering questions about the relative effects that different diet treatments have on insect response.en_US
dc.format.extent1452619 bytes
dc.format.extent3115 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlagen_US
dc.subject.otherFood Utilizationen_US
dc.subject.otherPlant Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherNutritional Indicesen_US
dc.subject.otherEcologyen_US
dc.subject.otherLife Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherGypsy Mothen_US
dc.subject.otherHost Switchingen_US
dc.titleNutritional indices in the gypsy moth ( Lymantria dispar (L.)) under field conditions and host switching situationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resources and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelMolecular, Cellular and Developmental Biologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumSchool of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, 48109-1115, Ann Arbor, MI, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumSchool of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, 48109-1115, Ann Arbor, MI, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherNortheastern Forest Experiment Station, USDA Forest Service, 06514, Hamden, CT, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/47803/1/442_2004_Article_BF00323145.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00323145en_US
dc.identifier.sourceOecologiaen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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