Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorScheinman, Jonen_US
dc.contributor.authorMahan, John D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAlon, Uri S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNorkus, Edward P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLande, Marc B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWeiss, Robert A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTrachtman, Howarden_US
dc.contributor.authorFlynn, Joseph T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, James C. M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-11T19:25:45Z
dc.date.available2006-09-11T19:25:45Z
dc.date.issued2003-10en_US
dc.identifier.citationChan, James C. M.; Mahan, John D.; Trachtman, Howard; Scheinman, Jon; Flynn, Joseph T.; Alon, Uri S.; Lande, Marc B.; Weiss, Robert A.; Norkus, Edward P.; (2003). "Vitamin E therapy in IgA nephropathy: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study." Pediatric Nephrology 18(10): 1015-1019. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47819>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0931-041Xen_US
dc.identifier.issn1432-198Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47819
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=12920628&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractIgA nephropathy is the world's most common primary glomerulonephropathy. Recent evidence in a rat model implicated excessive production of oxygen-free radicals in the pathogenesis and suggested that vitamin E-treatment ameliorated progression. We studied this antioxidant therapy on the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), proteinuria and hematuria in biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy in children. The duration of treatment or placebo was 2 years, with vitamin E treatment consisting of 400 IU/day in children weighing <30 kg, and twice that dose for those >30 kg. We measured GFR at entry, midpoint and exit. At baseline and at 4-month intervals after randomization, urinary protein/creatinine ratios and urinalysis were examined. The mixed model procedure with log transformation was used in data analysis to test treatment difference as well as the potential time effect. Fifty-five patients were randomized and 38 completed at least 1 year of follow-up. At entry, the clinical characteristics were not different between the treatment and placebo groups. There was a trend toward better preservation of GFR in vitamin E-treated versus placebo patients, 127±50 vs. 112±31 ml/min/1.73 m 2 , respectively ( P =0.09). The urinary protein/creatinine ratio was significantly lower in the vitamin E-treated group vs. placebo; 0.24±0.38 vs. 0.61±1.37 ( P <0.013). However, there was no difference in the prevalence of hematuria between the groups. Vitamin E treatment in our study patients was associated with significantly lower proteinuria, but no effect on hematuria. While there was a trend toward stabilization of GFR in the vitamin E-treated patients, long-term treatment and follow-up are needed to determine whether antioxidant therapy is associated with preservation of renal function in IgA nephropathy.en_US
dc.format.extent151705 bytes
dc.format.extent3115 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlag; IPNAen_US
dc.subject.otherMedicineen_US
dc.subject.otherIgA Nephropathyen_US
dc.subject.otherGlomerular Filtration Rateen_US
dc.subject.otherProteinuriaen_US
dc.subject.otherVitamin Een_US
dc.subject.otherAntioxidanten_US
dc.subject.otherHematuriaen_US
dc.titleVitamin E therapy in IgA nephropathy: a double-blind, placebo-controlled studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPublic Healthen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPediatricsen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelInternal Medicine and Specialtiesen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumUniversity of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherLong Island Jewish Hospital, New Hyde Park, New York, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherUniversity of Kansas, Kansas City, Kansas, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherVirginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA; The Barbara Bush Children's Hospital, Maine Medical Center, 22 Bramhall St., Portland, ME 04102-3175, USA; University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherMercy Children's Hospital, Kansas City, Kansas, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherUniversity of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherOur Lady of Mercy Medical Center, Bronx, New York, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherNew York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherOhio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.identifier.pmid12920628en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/47819/1/467_2003_Article_1205.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00467-003-1205-2en_US
dc.identifier.sourcePediatric Nephrologyen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


Files in this item

Show simple item record