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dc.contributor.authorFrisancho, A. Robertoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-11T19:27:12Z
dc.date.available2006-09-11T19:27:12Z
dc.date.issued1977-06en_US
dc.identifier.citationFrisancho, A. R.; (1977). "Developmental adaptation to high altitude hypoxia." International Journal of Biometeorology 21(2): 135-146. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47840>en_US
dc.identifier.issn1432-1254en_US
dc.identifier.issn0020-7128en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47840
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=334676&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractExperimental studies on animals and humans exposed to hypoxic stress have been reviewed. These data suggest that the influence of hypoxic stress, and the organism's response to it, are greater during growth than during adulthood. The organism's responses include alterations in the quantity and size of the alveolar units of the lungs, enlargement of the right ventricle of the heart, slower somatic growth as measured by birth weight and body size, increased aerobic capacity during maximal work, and greater control of ventilation. It is postulated that the organism is more sensitive to the influence of environmental factors during growth and development than during adulthood. Consequently, adaptive traits acquired during the developmental period have profound, long-term consequences, which are reflected in the physiological and morphological characteristics of the adult organism. It is concluded that the differences between the highland and lowland natives in their physiological performance and morphology are mostly due to adaptations acquired during the developmental period.en_US
dc.format.extent873989 bytes
dc.format.extent3115 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlag; Swets & Zeitlinger B.V.en_US
dc.subject.otherLife Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherAnimal Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.otherPlant Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.otherEnvironmental Medicineen_US
dc.titleDevelopmental adaptation to high altitude hypoxiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resources and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumCenter for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan, 1111 East Catherine Street, 48109, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.identifier.pmid334676en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/47840/1/484_2005_Article_BF01553707.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01553707en_US
dc.identifier.sourceInternational Journal of Biometeorologyen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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