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Impact of control for air pollution and respiratory epidemics on the estimated associations of temperature and daily mortality

dc.contributor.authorRamirez-Aguilar, Matianaen_US
dc.contributor.authorO’neill, Marie S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHajat, Shakooren_US
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, Joelen_US
dc.contributor.authorZanobetti, Antonellaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-11T19:27:24Z
dc.date.available2006-09-11T19:27:24Z
dc.date.issued2005-11en_US
dc.identifier.citationO’Neill, Marie S.; Hajat, Shakoor; Zanobetti, Antonella; Ramirez-Aguilar, Matiana; Schwartz, Joel; (2005). "Impact of control for air pollution and respiratory epidemics on the estimated associations of temperature and daily mortality." International Journal of Biometeorology 50(2): 121-129. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47843>en_US
dc.identifier.issn1432-1254en_US
dc.identifier.issn0020-7128en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47843
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=15912362&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractWe assessed the influence of control for air pollution and respiratory epidemics on associations between apparent temperature (AT) and daily mortality in Mexico City and Monterrey. Poisson regressions were fit to mortality among all ages, children (ages 0–14 years) and the elderly (ages ≥65 years). Predictors included mean daily AT, season, day of week and public holidays for the base model. Respiratory epidemics and air pollution (particulate matter <10 μm in aerodynamic diameter and O 3 ) were added singly and then jointly for a fully adjusted model. Percent changes in mortality were calculated for days of relatively extreme temperatures [cold (10–11°C) for both cities and heat (35–36°C) for Monterrey], compared to days at the overall mean temperature in each city (15°C in Mexico City, 25°C in Monterrey). In Mexico City, total mortality increased 12.4% [95% confidence interval (CI) 10.5%, 14.5%] on cold days (fully adjusted). Among children, the adjusted association was similar [10.9% (95% CI: 5.4%, 16.7%)], but without control for pollution and epidemics, was nearly twice as large [19.7% (95% CI: 13.9%, 25.9)]. In Monterrey, the fully adjusted heat effect for all deaths was 18.7% (95% CI: 11.7%, 26.1%), a third lower than the unadjusted estimate; the heat effect was lower among children [5.5% (95% CI: −10.1%, 23.8%)]. Cold had a similar effect on all-age mortality as in Mexico City [11.7% (95% CI: 3.7%, 20.3%)]. Responses of the elderly differed little from all-ages responses in both cities. Associations between weather and health persisted even with control for air pollution and respiratory epidemics in two Mexican cities, but risk assessments and climate change adaptation programs are best informed by analyses that account for these potential confounders.en_US
dc.format.extent319653 bytes
dc.format.extent3115 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlag; ISBen_US
dc.subject.otherWeatheren_US
dc.subject.otherMexicoen_US
dc.subject.otherAir Pollutionen_US
dc.subject.otherTemperatureen_US
dc.subject.otherMortalityen_US
dc.subject.otherLife Sciencesen_US
dc.titleImpact of control for air pollution and respiratory epidemics on the estimated associations of temperature and daily mortalityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resources and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, 1214 S. University, Ann Arbor, MI, 48104, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherInstituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Avenida Universidad 655, Col. Sta. María Ahuacatitlan, Cuernavaca, Morelos, 62508, Méxicoen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherHarvard School of Public Health, Exposure, Epidemiology, and Risk Program, 401 Park Drive Suite 415 West, Boston, MA, 02215, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherHarvard School of Public Health, Exposure, Epidemiology, and Risk Program, 401 Park Drive Suite 415 West, Boston, MA, 02215, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherLondon School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Public and Environmental Health Research Unit, Keppel Street, London, WC1E7HT, UKen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.identifier.pmid15912362en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/47843/1/484_2005_Article_269.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00484-005-0269-zen_US
dc.identifier.sourceInternational Journal of Biometeorologyen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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