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The origin and function of self-incompatibility in flowering plants

dc.contributor.authorOlmstead, R. G.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-11T19:27:32Z
dc.date.available2006-09-11T19:27:32Z
dc.date.issued1989-08en_US
dc.identifier.citationOlmstead, R. G.; (1989). "The origin and function of self-incompatibility in flowering plants." Sexual Plant Reproduction 2(3): 127-136. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47845>en_US
dc.identifier.issn1432-2145en_US
dc.identifier.issn0934-0882en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/47845
dc.description.abstractThe evolutionary significance of self-incompatibility (SI) traditionally has been linked to reduced inbreeding through enforced outcrossing. This view is founded on the premise that outcrossing reduces inbreeding. It is important, when considering the evolutionary significance of any genetic system, to try to distinguish those factors related to the evolution of, from those related to the maintenance of, the system in question. Three factors are considered important for the maintenance of SI: (1) phylogenetic constraint in species descended from SI ancestors, (2) reduced inbreeding in populations, and (3) fitness benefits to individuals resulting from the avoidance of selfing. I suggest that the first two factors should be rejected when considering the origin of SI (whether one or more origins are hypothesized) and that the increase in individual fitness resulting from the avoidance of self-fertilization among individuals that are heterozygous for deleterious alleles may be sufficient to account for the origin of SI. Self-fertilization in plants (except in species that predominantly self-fertilize) generally results in a reduction in fitness of some individuals due to the increased expression of deleterious or lethal recessive alleles, regardless of the degree of inbreeding in the population or the frequency of the allele in question. Inbreeding is a consequence of population structure in many outcrossing plant species. Complex (multi-locus and multi-allelic) systems of SI exist that reduce inbreeding. However, it is argued that these are derived either from simpler systems of SI that may have very little or no effect on inbreeding, in which case any effect on level of inbreeding is secondary, or are not true self-incompatibility systems and are part of a regulatory system that serves to balance the level of inbreeding and outbreeding. Multi-locus and multi-allelic systems of SI and heteromorphic systems of SI are discussed in terms of derived versus ancestral characteristics. A reassessment of the role of breeding systems in the development of a population structure promoting inbreeding is suggested, which may have been of crucial importance in the success and diversification of angiosperms.en_US
dc.format.extent1092614 bytes
dc.format.extent3115 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlagen_US
dc.subject.otherPopulation Structureen_US
dc.subject.otherSelf-incompatibilityen_US
dc.subject.otherBreeding Systemsen_US
dc.subject.otherCell Biologyen_US
dc.subject.otherLife Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherAgricultureen_US
dc.titleThe origin and function of self-incompatibility in flowering plantsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelMolecular, Cellular and Developmental Biologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Biology, University of Michigan, 48109, Ann Arbor, MI, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/47845/1/497_2004_Article_BF00192758.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00192758en_US
dc.identifier.sourceSexual Plant Reproductionen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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