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Perfluorinated Compounds in Aquatic Organisms at Various Trophic Levels in a Great Lakes Food Chain

dc.contributor.authorJude, David J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGiesy, John P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSinclair, Ewanen_US
dc.contributor.authorKannan, Kurunthachalamen_US
dc.contributor.authorPastva, Stephanie D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTao, Linen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-11T19:45:03Z
dc.date.available2006-09-11T19:45:03Z
dc.date.issued2005-05en_US
dc.identifier.citationKannan, Kurunthachalam; Tao, Lin; Sinclair, Ewan; Pastva, Stephanie D; Jude, Dave J; Giesy, John P; (2005). "Perfluorinated Compounds in Aquatic Organisms at Various Trophic Levels in a Great Lakes Food Chain." Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 48(4): 559-566. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48085>en_US
dc.identifier.issn1432-0703en_US
dc.identifier.issn0090-4341en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48085
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=15883668&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractTrophic transfer of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and other related perfluorinated compounds was examined in a Great Lakes benthic foodweb including water–algae–zebra mussel–round goby–smallmouth bass. In addition, perfluorinated compounds were measured in livers and eggs of Chinook salmon and lake whitefish, in muscle tissue of carp, and in eggs of brown trout collected from Michigan. Similarly, green frog livers, snapping turtle plasma, mink livers, and bald eagle tissues were analyzed to determine concentrations in higher trophic-level organisms in the food chain. PFOS was the most widely detected compound in benthic organisms at various trophic levels. Concentrations of PFOS in benthic invertebrates such as amphipods and zebra mussels were approximately 1000-fold greater than those in surrounding water, which suggested a bioconcentration factor (BCF; concentration in biota/concentration in water) of 1000 in benthic invertebrates. Concentrations of PFOS in round gobies were two- to fourfold greater than those in their prey organisms such as zebra mussels and amphipods. Concentrations of PFOS in predatory fishes (Chinook salmon and lake whitefish) were 10 to 20-fold greater than those in their prey species. Concentrations of PFOS in mink and bald eagles were, on average, 5- to 10-fold greater than those in Chinook salmon, carp, or snapping turtles. Because of the accumulation of PFOS in liver and blood, the biomagnification factor (BMF) of perfluorinated compounds in higher trophic-level organisms such as salmonid fishes, mink, and eagles were based on the concentrations in livers or plasma. Overall, these results suggest a BCF of PFOS of approximately 1000 (whole-body based) in benthic invertebrates, and a BMF of 10 to 20 in mink or bald eagles, relative to their prey items. Eggs of fish contained notable concentrations of PFOS, suggesting oviparous transfer of this compound. PFOA was found in water, but its biomagnification potential was lower than that of PFOS.en_US
dc.format.extent119197 bytes
dc.format.extent3115 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlag; Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.en_US
dc.subject.otherAgricultureen_US
dc.subject.otherSoil Science & Conservationen_US
dc.subject.otherEnvironment, Generalen_US
dc.subject.otherEnvironmenten_US
dc.subject.otherForestryen_US
dc.subject.otherEcologyen_US
dc.subject.otherTerrestrial Pollutionen_US
dc.titlePerfluorinated Compounds in Aquatic Organisms at Various Trophic Levels in a Great Lakes Food Chainen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPublic Healthen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumSchool of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Michigan, 501 East University, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherNational Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Department of Zoology, Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824-1311, USA; Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kongen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherWadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health and Toxicology, School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, Empire State Plaza, 509, Albany, New York, 12201-0509, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherNational Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Department of Zoology, Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824-1311, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherWadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health and Toxicology, School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, Empire State Plaza, 509, Albany, New York, 12201-0509, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherWadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health and Toxicology, School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, Empire State Plaza, 509, Albany, New York, 12201-0509, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.identifier.pmid15883668en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/48085/1/244_2004_Article_133.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00244-004-0133-xen_US
dc.identifier.sourceArchives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicologyen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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