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dc.contributor.authorNassauer, Joan Iversonen_US
dc.contributor.authorAllan, J. Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorJohengen, Thomas H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKosek, Sandra E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorInfante, Danaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-11T19:47:29Z
dc.date.available2006-09-11T19:47:29Z
dc.date.issued2004-09en_US
dc.identifier.citationNassauer, Joan Iverson; Allan, J. David; Johengen, Thomas; Kosek, Sandra E.; Infante, Dana; (2004). "Exurban residential subdivision development: Effects on water quality and public perception." Urban Ecosystems 7(3): 267-281. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48117>en_US
dc.identifier.issn1083-8155en_US
dc.identifier.issn1573-1642en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48117
dc.description.abstractWe investigated how future alternative designs for exurban residential subdivision development in agricultural landscapes might affect aquatic ecosystems and public perceptions, and we asked whether better aquatic ecological quality would correspond with public perceptions of greater landscape attractiveness. The alternative exurban futures we compared were: ecologically beneficial subdivisions, conventional subdivisions, and conventional agriculture. To judge their aquatic ecology effects we measured the chemistry and biota of six first-order streams within our study area, the Huron and Raisin River watersheds in the Detroit CMSA. We chose two stream catchments that exhibited land cover to represent the same proportions as each of three types of alternative exurban futures. Streams in catchments representing ecologically beneficial subdivision designs had the most total macroinvertebrate taxa, the most sensitive macroinvertebrate taxa, lowest nitrates, lowest total phosphorus, and lowest total suspended materials. Nutrient concentrations were highest in agricultural catchments, and suspended sediments were highest in conventional subdivision catchments. To compare public perceptions of the alternative futures, we surveyed 336 suburban and exurban adult residents of the upper Midwest. All respondents viewed digital imaging simulations of each of the futures and rated their attractiveness as if they were seen from the window of a home in the area. Ecologically beneficial futures were perceived as most attractive. Comparing the alternative futures, rankings of aquatic ecological quality were consistent with public perceptions of attractiveness.en_US
dc.format.extent282027 bytes
dc.format.extent3115 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherKluwer Academic Publishers; Springer Science+Business Mediaen_US
dc.subject.otherLife Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherEcologyen_US
dc.subject.otherEnvironmental Managementen_US
dc.subject.otherNature Conservationen_US
dc.subject.otherWatersheden_US
dc.subject.otherLandscapeen_US
dc.subject.otherAgricultureen_US
dc.subject.otherSprawlen_US
dc.subject.otherWeb-based Surveyen_US
dc.titleExurban residential subdivision development: Effects on water quality and public perceptionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resources and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelUrban Planningen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPhilosophyen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHumanitiesen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumSchool of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 48109, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumSchool of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 48109, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumSchool of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 48109, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumSchool of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 48109, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumSchool of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 48109, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/48117/1/11252_2004_Article_5277569.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1023/B:UECO.0000044039.65448.48en_US
dc.identifier.sourceUrban Ecosystemsen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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