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dc.contributor.authorFarah, Mohamed H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEaster, Stephen S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-20T15:01:23Z
dc.date.available2006-09-20T15:01:23Z
dc.date.issued2005-08-15en_US
dc.identifier.citationFarah, Mohamed H.; Easter, Stephen S. (2005)."Cell birth and death in the mouse retinal ganglion cell layer." The Journal of Comparative Neurology 489(1): 120-134. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48679>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-9967en_US
dc.identifier.issn1096-9861en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48679
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=15977166&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractHere we describe quantitatively the birth and death of the two separate populations of neurons, ganglion cells and displaced amacrine cells, in the mouse retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL). The two cell types, which are roughly equally numerous, were distinguished pre- and postnatally by labeling the ganglion cells retrogradely with fluorescent dye. Embryos were labeled cumulatively with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) delivered by an osmotic minipump implanted in the mother; cell birth dates were established as having occurred before or after pump implantation. Early cohorts (GCL cells born before embryonic day [E] 11.8 and E12.8) were 98 ± 1.1% and 99 ± 0.2% ganglion cells (mean ± SEM), respectively, and a late cohort (born after E15.8) was 97 ± 1.2% displaced amacrines. Thus birth date was a strong predictor of a GCL cell's ultimate identity. Cell death in each cohort was estimated by counting cells at different time points (soon after the cohort was produced and later) and subtracting the later from the earlier number. This method avoids the problem of simultaneous birth and death that has plagued many of the earlier attempts to assess cell death. Negligible numbers died during the first week after a cell's birthday. The amount of cell death differed in the two cohorts; 48.5 ± 15% and 29.0 ± 12.4% in early and late, respectively, and most of it was postnatal. These findings disagree sharply with an earlier conclusion that ganglion cells die within 5 days of their birthdays or not at all. J. Comp. Neurol. 489:120–134, 2005. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_US
dc.format.extent1489481 bytes
dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Companyen_US
dc.subject.otherLife and Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherNeuroscience, Neurology and Psychiatryen_US
dc.titleCell birth and death in the mouse retinal ganglion cell layeren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.robotsIndexNoFollowen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumNeuroscience Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1048 ; Division of Neuropathology, Johns Hopkins University, 558 Ross Research Bldg., 720 Rutland Ave., Baltimore, MD 21205-2196en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumNeuroscience Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1048 ; Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1048en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15977166en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/48679/1/20615_ftp.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cne.20615en_US
dc.identifier.sourceThe Journal of Comparative Neurologyen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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