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Profit maximization versus disadvantageous inequality: the impact of self-categorization

dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Stephen M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTor, Avishalomen_US
dc.contributor.authorBazerman, Max H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Dale T.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-20T15:02:32Z
dc.date.available2006-09-20T15:02:32Z
dc.date.issued2005-07en_US
dc.identifier.citationGarcia, Stephen M.; Tor, Avishalom; Bazerman, Max H.; Miller, Dale T. (2005)."Profit maximization versus disadvantageous inequality: the impact of self-categorization." Journal of Behavioral Decision Making 18(3): 187-198. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48694>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0894-3257en_US
dc.identifier.issn1099-0771en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48694
dc.description.abstractChoice behavior researchers (e.g., Bazerman, Loewenstein, & White, 1992 ) have found that individuals tend to choose a more lucrative but disadvantageously unequal payoff (e.g., self—$600/other—$800) over a less profitable but equal one (e.g., self—$500/other—$500); greater profit trumps interpersonal social comparison concerns in the choice setting. We suggest, however, that self-categorization (e.g., Hogg, 2000 ) can shift interpersonal social comparison concerns to the intergroup level and make trading disadvantageous inequality for greater profit more difficult. Studies 1–3 show that profit maximization diminishes when recipients belong to different social categories (e.g., genders, universities). Study 2 further implicates self-categorization, as self-categorized individuals tend to forgo profit whether making a choice for themselves or another ingroup member. Study 3, moreover, reveals that social categorization alone is not sufficient to diminish profit maximization; individuals must self-categorize and identify with their categorization. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.format.extent109746 bytes
dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.subject.otherBusiness, Finance & Managementen_US
dc.titleProfit maximization versus disadvantageous inequality: the impact of self-categorizationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.robotsIndexNoFollowen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumUniversity of Michigan, USA ; University of Michigan, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1220, USA.en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherHaifa University Faculty of Law, Israelen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherHarvard University, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherStanford University, USAen_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/48694/1/494_ftp.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdm.494en_US
dc.identifier.sourceJournal of Behavioral Decision Makingen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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