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Seasonal Movement Patterns of Walleye (sander vitreus) in Muskegon River and Musekgon Lake

dc.contributor.authorHanson, Jonathon
dc.contributor.advisorWebb, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2006-12-12T19:14:21Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONen
dc.date.available2006-12-12T19:14:21Z
dc.date.issued2006-12-30
dc.date.submitted2006-12-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48786
dc.description.abstractAbstract Walleye (Sander vitreus) are known to travel long distances between spawning, foraging and over wintering habitats. In the Muskegon system walleye have the choice of moving between Muskegon River, Muskegon Lake and Lake Michigan throughout the year. The purpose of this study was to determine the seasonal movement of walleye in the Muskegon system. In 2004 and 2005 a total of 15 walleye were implanted with radio transmitters and 5 with ultrasonic transmitters. During March, April, and May walleye were located in Muskegon River, near Croton Dam, presumably to spawn. By June 10 of 12 fish tracked had departed the river for Muskegon Lake or left the Muskegon system. In June, July and August 85% (17/20) of tracked walleye inhabited Muskegon Lake or were outside the Muskegon system. From September through February 6 of 7 tracked fish were located in lacustrine habitat. I documented one walleye periodically traveling between Muskegon Lake and Lake Michigan during November and December. Based on movement results telemetry data were categorized into three time periods; spring, which included pre- and post spawning periods (March – May), summer (June – August), and winter (September – February). Range (total distance displaced) of tagged walleye was greatest during spring due to spawning migrations in Muskegon River. Spring range of all walleye varied from 3,467 to 150,900 m; summer range varied from 131 to 46,114 m; and winter range from 326 to 42,650 m. There were significant differences between spring and summer ranges (p< 0.001) and between spring and winter ranges (p = 0.024), but not between 2 summer and winter ranges (p = 0.223). During summer, total range of fish inhabiting Muskegon River was significantly different than those fish in Muskegon Lake. These differences between Muskegon River and Lake are attributed to the energetic costs for large walleye to search long distances for prey in flowing water versus searching for prey in the lacustrine environment. Movement results from this study emphasize the importance of the habitat connection within this system, and may also assist managers in determining when and where to calculate population estimates.en
dc.format.extent425056 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectWalleyeen
dc.subjectSander Vitreusen
dc.titleSeasonal Movement Patterns of Walleye (sander vitreus) in Muskegon River and Musekgon Lakeen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.thesisdegreenameMaster of Scienceen
dc.description.thesisdegreedisciplineSchool of Natural Resources & Environmenten
dc.description.thesisdegreegrantorUniversity of Michiganen
dc.contributor.committeememberDiana, James
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resources and Environment
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScience
dc.identifier.uniqnamejonhans
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/48786/1/JonHanson_Thesis.pdfen_US
dc.owningcollnameDissertations and Theses (Ph.D. and Master's)


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