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DPM, a fast, accurate Monte Carlo code optimized for photon and electron radiotherapy treatment planning dose calculations

dc.contributor.authorSempau, Josepen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilderman, Scott J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBielajew, Alex F.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-12-19T19:03:34Z
dc.date.available2006-12-19T19:03:34Z
dc.date.issued2000-08-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationSempau, Josep; Wilderman, Scott J; Bielajew, Alex F (2000). "DPM, a fast, accurate Monte Carlo code optimized for photon and electron radiotherapy treatment planning dose calculations." Physics in Medicine and Biology. 45(8): 2263-2291. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48969>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0031-9155en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48969
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=10958194&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractA new Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm, the `dose planning method' (DPM), and its associated computer program for simulating the transport of electrons and photons in radiotherapy class problems employing primary electron beams, is presented. DPM is intended to be a high-accuracy MC alternative to the current generation of treatment planning codes which rely on analytical algorithms based on an approximate solution of the photon/electron Boltzmann transport equation. For primary electron beams, DPM is capable of computing 3D dose distributions (in 1 mm3 voxels) which agree to within 1% in dose maximum with widely used and exhaustively benchmarked general-purpose public-domain MC codes in only a fraction of the CPU time. A representative problem, the simulation of 1 million 10 MeV electrons impinging upon a water phantom of 1283 voxels of 1 mm on a side, can be performed by DPM in roughly 3 min on a modern desktop workstation. DPM achieves this performance by employing transport mechanics and electron multiple scattering distribution functions which have been derived to permit long transport steps (of the order of 5 mm) which can cross heterogeneity boundaries. The underlying algorithm is a `mixed' class simulation scheme, with differential cross sections for hard inelastic collisions and bremsstrahlung events described in an approximate manner to simplify their sampling. The continuous energy loss approximation is employed for energy losses below some predefined thresholds, and photon transport (including Compton, photoelectric absorption and pair production) is simulated in an analogue manner. The δ-scattering method (Woodcock tracking) is adopted to minimize the computational costs of transporting photons across voxels.en_US
dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.extent303621 bytes
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherIOP Publishing Ltden_US
dc.titleDPM, a fast, accurate Monte Carlo code optimized for photon and electron radiotherapy treatment planning dose calculationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPhysicsen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; Institut de Tècniques Energètiques, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona, Spainen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.identifier.pmid10958194en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/48969/2/m00815.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/45/8/315en_US
dc.identifier.sourcePhysics in Medicine and Biology.en_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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