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Use of the National Cancer Data Base to develop clinical trials accrual targets that are appropriate for minority ethnicity patients

dc.contributor.authorNewman, Lisa A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Cheryl T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorParekh, Lina Patelen_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Andrew K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Charles R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBeltran, Robert A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLucci, Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Bettyeen_US
dc.contributor.authorOta, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Heidien_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-17T15:52:03Z
dc.date.available2007-01-17T15:52:03Z
dc.date.issued2006-01-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationNewman, Lisa A.; Lee, Cheryl T.; Parekh, Lina Patel; Stewart, Andrew K.; Thomas, Charles R.; Beltran, Robert A.; Lucci, Anthony; Green, Bettye; Ota, David; Nelson, Heidi (2006)."Use of the National Cancer Data Base to develop clinical trials accrual targets that are appropriate for minority ethnicity patients." Cancer 106(1): 188-195. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49271>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0008-543Xen_US
dc.identifier.issn1097-0142en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49271
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=16333856&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND Disparities in cancer outcome among different subsets of the American population related to ethnic background have been well documented. Clinical trials represent the most powerful strategy for improving cancer treatments, but racial and ethnic minority patients are frequently underrepresented among patients accrued to these protocols. Proof of comparable efficacy for a promising cancer therapy in different groups of patients requires diversity in the clinical trial populations so that study results will be generalizable. Appropriate targets for accrual of minority ethnicity patients have not previously been defined. METHODS The National Cancer Database (NCDB) is maintained jointly by the American Cancer Society and the American College of Surgeons. Information submitted by tumor registries throughout the United States represents an estimated 70% of newly diagnosed cancer cases. The authors analyzed NCDB reports on ethnic distribution of patients with breast, prostate, nonsmall cell lung, and colorectal cancer, stratified by stage of disease at diagnosis. RESULTS African Americans with cancer of the breast and prostate had the most notable patterns of disproportionate representation among populations with advanced-stage disease. The authors compiled a table of suggested accrual targets for selected solid-organ cancers based on NCDB stage-specific reports. CONCLUSIONS Clinical trial results will be more meaningful if participating patients reflect the site- and stage-specific populations that are under study. The authors recommended that clinical trial investigators incorporate accrual targets for minority ethnicity populations into the study design. Cancer 2006. © 2005 American Cancer Society.en_US
dc.format.extent175647 bytes
dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Companyen_US
dc.subject.otherLife and Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherCancer Research, Oncology and Pathologyen_US
dc.titleUse of the National Cancer Data Base to develop clinical trials accrual targets that are appropriate for minority ethnicity patientsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.robotsIndexNoFollowen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelOncology and Hematologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPublic Healthen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan ; Fax: (734) 647-9647 ; Breast Care Center, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, 3308 Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0932en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherAmerican College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer, Chicago, Illinoisen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherAmerican College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer, Chicago, Illinoisen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine, Portland, Oregonen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherLatino Med Policy Group, Chicago, Illinoisen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texasen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherLatino Med Policy Group, Chicago, Illinoisen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolinaen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesotaen_US
dc.identifier.pmid16333856en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/49271/1/21592_ftp.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.21592en_US
dc.identifier.sourceCanceren_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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