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dc.contributor.authorParent, Jack M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorElliott, Robert C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPleasure, Samuel J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarbaro, Nicholas M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLowenstein, Daniel H.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-17T15:52:56Z
dc.date.available2007-01-17T15:52:56Z
dc.date.issued2006-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationParent, Jack M.; Elliott, Robert C.; Pleasure, Samuel J.; Barbaro, Nicholas M.; Lowenstein, Daniel H. (2006)."Aberrant seizure-induced neurogenesis in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy." Annals of Neurology 59(1): 81-91. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49280>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0364-5134en_US
dc.identifier.issn1531-8249en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49280
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=16261566&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractNeurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus persists throughout life and is increased by seizures. The dentate granule cell (DGC) layer is often abnormal in human and experimental temporal lobe epilepsy, with dispersion of the layer and the appearance of ectopic granule neurons in the hilus. We tested the hypothesis that these abnormalities result from aberrant DGC neurogenesis after seizure-induced injury. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry were used to identify proliferating progenitors and mature DGCs in the adult rat pilocarpine temporal lobe epilepsy model. We also examined dentate gyri from epileptic human hippocampal surgical specimens. Prox-1 immunohistochemistry and pulse-chase bromodeoxyuridine labeling showed that progenitors migrate aberrantly to the hilus and molecular layer after prolonged seizures and differentiate into ectopic DGCs in rat. Neuroblast marker expression indicated the delayed appearance of chainlike progenitor cell formations extending into the hilus and molecular layer, suggesting that seizures alter migratory behavior of DGC precursors. Ectopic putative DGCs also were found in the hilus and molecular layer of epileptic human dentate gyrus. These findings indicate that seizure-induced abnormalities of neuroblast migration lead to abnormal integration of newborn DGCs in the epileptic adult hippocampus, and implicate aberrant neurogenesis in the development or progression of recurrent seizures. Ann Neurol 2005en_US
dc.format.extent761185 bytes
dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Companyen_US
dc.subject.otherLife and Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherNeuroscience, Neurology, and Psychiatryen_US
dc.titleAberrant seizure-induced neurogenesis in experimental temporal lobe epilepsyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.robotsIndexNoFollowen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPsychiatryen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Neurology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI ; Department of Neurology, University of Michigan Medical Center, 4412 Kresge III, 200 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0585en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherNational Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MDen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Neurosurgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CAen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationotherDepartment of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CAen_US
dc.identifier.pmid16261566en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/49280/1/20699_ftp.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.20699en_US
dc.identifier.sourceAnnals of Neurologyen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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