Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSantelmann, M. V.
dc.contributor.authorWhite, David S.
dc.contributor.authorFreemark, K.
dc.contributor.authorNassauer, Joan Iverson
dc.contributor.authorEilers, J. M.
dc.contributor.authorVache, K. B.
dc.contributor.authorDanielson, B. J.
dc.contributor.authorCorry, Robert C.
dc.contributor.authorClark, M. E.
dc.contributor.authorPolasky, S.
dc.contributor.authorCruse, Richard M.
dc.contributor.authorSifneos, J.
dc.contributor.authorRustigian, H.
dc.contributor.authorCoiner, C.
dc.contributor.authorWu, J.
dc.contributor.authorDebinski, D.
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-30T19:26:49Z
dc.date.available2007-01-30T19:26:49Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationLandscape Ecology, vol. 19, 2004, pp. 357-374 <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49340>en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49340
dc.description.abstractThe contributions of current agricultural practices to environmental degradation and the social problems facing agricultual regions are well known. However, landscape-scale alternatives to current trends have not been fully explored nor their potential impacts quantified. To address this research need, our interdisciplinary team designed three alternative future scenarios for two watersheds in Iowa, USA, and used spatially-explicit models to evaluate the potential consequences of changes in farmland management. This paper summarizes and integrates the results of this interdisciplinary research project into an assessment of the designed alternatives intended to improve our understanding of landscape ecology in agricultural ecosystems and to inform agricultural policy. Scenario futures were digitized into a Geographic Information System (GIS), visualized with maps and simulated images, and evaluated for multiple endpoints to assess impacts of land use change on water quality, social and economic goals, and native flora and fauna. The Biodiversity scenario, targeting restoration of indigenous biodiversity, ranked higher than the current landscape for all endpoints (biodiversity, water quality, farmer preference, and profitability). The Biodiversity scenario ranked higher than the Production scenario (which focused on profitable agricultural production) in all endpoints but profitability, for which the two scenarios scored similarly, and also ranked higher than the Water Quality scenario in all enpoints except water quality. The Water Quality scenario, which targeted improvement in water quality, ranked highest of all landscapes in potential water quality and higher than the current landsape and the Production scenario in all but profitability. Our results indicate that innovative agricultural practices targeting environmental improvements may be acceptable to farmers and could substantially reduce the environmental impacts of agriculture in this region.en
dc.format.extent540350 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherKluwer Academic Publishersen
dc.subjectAgricultureen
dc.subjectBiodiversityen
dc.subjectSocio-economicsen
dc.subjectScenariosen
dc.subjectWater Qualityen
dc.titleAssessing Alternative Futures of Agriculture in Iowa, U.S.A.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resources and Environment
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScience
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden
dc.contributor.affiliationumNatural Resources and Environment, School ofen
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/49340/1/LE04Santel.pdfen_US
dc.owningcollnameEnvironment and Sustainability, School for (SEAS/SNRE)


Files in this item

Show simple item record