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Creating a Neighborhood of Choice: A Neighborhood Plan for Grand Traverse

dc.contributor.authorWu, Chia-Jin
dc.contributor.authorBryant, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Richard
dc.contributor.authorZettel, Adam
dc.contributor.authorZimmer, Jason
dc.contributor.authorZwagerman, Brandon
dc.contributor.authorZwas, Amy
dc.contributor.authorIppel, Jonathan
dc.contributor.advisorDewar, Margaret
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-30T14:29:47Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONen
dc.date.available2007-03-30T14:29:47Z
dc.date.issued2007-04-30
dc.date.submitted2006-10
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49545
dc.description.abstractUniversity of Michigan Urban & Regional Planning A Neighborhood Plan for Grand Traverse S s ummaAry Creating a Neighborhood of Choice is a plan for the Grand Traverse District Neighborhood Association (GTDNA) to stabilize and revitalize its neighborhood. The Grand Traverse District is an approximately 70 square block neighborhood west of downtown Flint. The neighborhood’s boundaries follow I-69 to the south, the Swartz and Thread Creeks to the west, the Flint River to the north, and Beach Street to the east. This area is home to approximately one thousand residents, as well as professional offices, neighborhood businesses, and social service organizations. T t he Neighborhood In 1960, the population of the neighborhood stood at approximately 4000 people and now is down to 1000 people. Grand Traverse today has a racially diverse population but has significantly lower household incomes on average, a significantly higher proportion of renters, and lower access to vehicles among renter households than the City of Flint as a whole. The Grand Traverse neighborhood has a variety of land uses, neighborhood businesses, historic homes, and recreational possibilities, but signs of disinvestment are apparent in the high number of vacant lots, damaged structures, poorly maintained homes, and parks in need of maintenance. Several busy one-way thoroughfares pass through the neighborhood, acting as dividers but also providing fast access to other areas. A a ssets The neighborhood has numerous assets that make it a good candidate for a revitalization plan. Downtown: The neighborhood is adjacent to downtown Flint, which is recently benefiting from new development, streetscape improvements, rehabilitation of historic structures and a redevelopment plan by Sasaki and Associates. Natural Features and Parks: The Flint River and Swartz and Thread Creeks form the boundaries of the neighborhood, providing the potential for recreational opportunities. Plans to extend the Flint River Trail into the neighborhood also provide possibilities for the neighborhood. In addition, the neighborhood is home to Memorial Park, a large park in the center of the neighborhood. Diversity: While Flint as whole is diverse, neighborhoods tend to be segregated by both race and income. Grand Traverse, on the other hand, is diverse in race and income which is a unique asset. Residents’ Energy and Commitment: The association members are committed to their neighborhood and are willing to invest the time and energy necessary to realize their vision. O o pportunNities There are a number of current and future activities in or near the neighborhood that the association can build on to gain momentum for this plan. These include: Land Bank: The Genesee County Land Bank owns much vacant land in the district and has designated the neighborhood a Rejuvenation Target Area. Two-way Street Initiative: The Genesee County Metropolitan Planning Commission is about to undertake an effort to change some of the existing one-way streets into two-way streets. Downtown Revitalization Activities: A number of foundations, private investors, governmental entities and universities are working to revitalize downtown Flint. VisionN GTDNA members summarized their hopes in the following statement: t he GgraAnd TtraAverse Ddistrict will be aA diverse urbaAn neighborhood. Iit will be well-maAintaAined neighborhood for residents aAnd businesses, aA vibraAnt saAfe community of choice. The residents determined five goals to achieve in order to make their vision a reality. The plan’s recommendations are organized around these goals.en
dc.format.extent9608696 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectGrand Traverseen
dc.subjectDowntown Flinten
dc.subject.otherNeighborhood Plan for Grand Traverseen
dc.titleCreating a Neighborhood of Choice: A Neighborhood Plan for Grand Traverseen
dc.typePracticumen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesisdegreenameMaster of Landscape Architectureen
dc.description.thesisdegreedisciplineSchool of Natural Resources and Environmenten
dc.description.thesisdegreegrantorUniversity of Michiganen
dc.contributor.committeememberDueweke, Eric
dc.identifier.uniqnamewchiajinen
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/49545/1/Grand Traverse District Neighborhood Plan 2006.pdfen_US
dc.owningcollnameDissertations and Theses (Ph.D. and Master's)


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