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Morphogenesis of the palate in normal human embryos with special emphasis on the mechanisms involved This investigation was supported by research grant HD 00178 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and a National Science Foundation Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (GE-6283) to K. F.

dc.contributor.authorBurdi, Alphonse R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFaist, Kathleenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-06T17:40:35Z
dc.date.available2007-04-06T17:40:35Z
dc.date.issued1967-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationBurdi, Alphonse R.; Faist, Kathleen (1967)."Morphogenesis of the palate in normal human embryos with special emphasis on the mechanisms involved This investigation was supported by research grant HD 00178 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and a National Science Foundation Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (GE-6283) to K. F. ." American Journal of Anatomy 120(1): 149-159. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49643>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-9106en_US
dc.identifier.issn1553-0795en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49643
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to re-evaluate the classical description of fusion as the closure mechanism of both the hard and soft palates in normal human embryos. Does the soft palate develop by a posterior continuation of shelf apposition, epithelial lamination and disintegration, and by mesenchymal cell fusion as described for the hard palate? Or does the soft palate develop by proliferation and migration of subepithelial mesenchymal growth centers at the posterior edge of the fused hard palate so that the early furrow which separates the two primordial processes of the soft palate is progressively obliterated by mesenchymal merging at the furrow base? Observations of human embryos prior to, during, and after palatal closure (7–12 wks, 18–75 mm C-R length) indicated (1) an anteroposterior gradient of palatal closure beginning at the primary palate and (2) epithelial fusion remnants found only in the hard palate regions. These observations suggest that the soft palate develops by a displacement of epithelium by mesenchymal merging rather than by epithelial fusion of the entire secondary palatine processes.en_US
dc.format.extent797574 bytes
dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.publisherWiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Companyen_US
dc.subject.otherLife and Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherCell & Developmental Biologyen_US
dc.titleMorphogenesis of the palate in normal human embryos with special emphasis on the mechanisms involved This investigation was supported by research grant HD 00178 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and a National Science Foundation Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (GE-6283) to K. F.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.robotsIndexNoFollowen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelMedicine (General)en_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Anatomy, 2500 East Medical Building, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Anatomy, 2500 East Medical Building, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/49643/1/1001200112_ftp.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aja.1001200112en_US
dc.identifier.sourceAmerican Journal of Anatomyen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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