Tooth transplantation in the mouse. I. The use of procion dyes and tritiated proline in a study of syngeneic tooth germ transplantation Supported by grant DE-02731 from the National Institute for Dental Research, PHS.

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dc.contributor.author Klein, Jan en_US
dc.contributor.author Secosky, Walter R. en_US
dc.contributor.author Klein, Dagmar en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2007-04-06T17:41:53Z
dc.date.available 2007-04-06T17:41:53Z
dc.date.issued 1971-07 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Klein, Jan; Secosky, Walter R.; Klein, Dagmar (1971)."Tooth transplantation in the mouse. I. The use of procion dyes and tritiated proline in a study of syngeneic tooth germ transplantation Supported by grant DE-02731 from the National Institute for Dental Research, PHS. ." American Journal of Anatomy 131(3): 371-385. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49656> en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0002-9106 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1553-0795 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49656
dc.identifier.uri http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=4104691&dopt=citation en_US
dc.description.abstract Tooth germs of first molars from four- to six-day old mice were transplanted heterotopically into the connective tissue under the dorsal skin of adult syngeneic recipients. The rate of the transplants was studied by histologic staining, vital staining with procion dyes, and autoradiography. Together these methods provided the following picture of the development of the transplant. Extraction of the tooth germ severs its vascular connections and disturbs the nutritional environment of the tooth so that many cells undergo necrosis and degeneration. The resulting inflammatory response clears the transplant of necrotic tissue, leaving a fibrous pulp of low cellularity and an extensively disrupted odontoblastic layer; the enamel organ is reduced to only a few epithelial cells. In the second week following transplantation, however, the surviving cells start to proliferate and the tissues of the transplant begin to reorganize. Reorganization starts at the apical foramen and spreads to the rest of the tooth. The central pulp is penetrated by new blood vessels, its cellular content is reestablished, and its morphology returns to normal. Odontoblasts start producing dentin which at first is highly irregular and contains many cells (osteodentin). Later the dentin formation becomes more and more regular and the dentin assumes its normal tubular structure. New enamel is not formed at any time after transplantation. The cells of the enamel organ undergo squamous metaplasia and form epithelial cysts. Abortive root formation is observed but typical roots never develop. Rudiments of periodontal ligament develop rarely. The transplants are enclosed in a capsule of connective tissue. It is concluded that the heterotopically transplanted tooth germs maintain their capability to recover, develop, and differentiate in syngeneic recipients. Although almost all of the developmental processes continue in the transplant after a period of adjustment, some of them are abortive. en_US
dc.format.extent 1323207 bytes
dc.format.extent 3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype text/plain
dc.publisher Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company en_US
dc.subject.other Life and Medical Sciences en_US
dc.subject.other Cell & Developmental Biology en_US
dc.title Tooth transplantation in the mouse. I. The use of procion dyes and tritiated proline in a study of syngeneic tooth germ transplantation Supported by grant DE-02731 from the National Institute for Dental Research, PHS. en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.rights.robots IndexNoFollow en_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Medicine (General) en_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevel Health Sciences en_US
dc.description.peerreviewed Peer Reviewed en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum Departments of Oral Biology, Oral Surgery and Human Genetics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104 en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum Departments of Oral Biology, Oral Surgery and Human Genetics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104 ; Portions of this investigation are being submitted as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Science degree in oral surgery, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, Ann Arbor, Michigan. en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum Departments of Oral Biology, Oral Surgery and Human Genetics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104 en_US
dc.identifier.pmid 4104691 en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurl http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/49656/1/1001310307_ftp.pdf en_US
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aja.1001310307 en_US
dc.identifier.source American Journal of Anatomy en_US
dc.owningcollname Interdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed
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