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dc.contributor.authorSevern, Charles B.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-06T17:41:59Z
dc.date.available2007-04-06T17:41:59Z
dc.date.issued1972-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationSevern, Charles B. (1972)."A morphological study of the development of the human liver. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health, Training grant 6M312. II. Establishment of liver parenchyma, extrahepatic ducts and associated venous channels." American Journal of Anatomy 133(1): 85-107. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49657>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-9106en_US
dc.identifier.issn1553-0795en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49657
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=5008885&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractThe establishment of liver parenchyma, extrahepatic ducts and associated venous channels were examined in serial sections of 100 human embryos representative of Horizons XI through XVII. The liver parenchyma first begins to develop from the cephalic end of the hepatic diverticulum in embryos between the 20- and 25-somite stage. The parenchyma develops as cords from the walls of the diverticulum which anastomose around isolated endothelium-lined spaces (blood islands) in the septum transversum. As growth and anastomoses of the parenchymal cords continue, the isolated endothelium-lined spaces form an interconnecting capillary bed which interdigitates with the developing parenchymal cords. The larger omphalomesenteric veins develop simultaneously with the parenchyma and are continuous with the smaller venous channels which interdigitate with the parenchymal cords. These larger developing veins become surrounded by the developing parenchymal cords. As the parenchymal cords branch from the cephalic end of the diverticulum, that portion of the diverticulum becomes reduced to a small tubular structure, the common hepatic duct, which is always continuous with the parenchyma. As the cephalic portion of the original diverticulum is reduced in size, there is a localized outgrowth from the ventral wall of the caudal end of the original diverticulum. This localized outgrowth becomes the cystic duct and gallbladder. The remainder of the caudal segment of the diverticulum elongates to become the common bile duct. The ventral pancreas develops as a localized outgrowth from the dorsal wall of the common bile duct.en_US
dc.format.extent2518316 bytes
dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.publisherWiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Companyen_US
dc.subject.otherLife and Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherCell & Developmental Biologyen_US
dc.titleA morphological study of the development of the human liver. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health, Training grant 6M312. II. Establishment of liver parenchyma, extrahepatic ducts and associated venous channelsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.robotsIndexNoFollowen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelMedicine (General)en_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Anatomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104en_US
dc.identifier.pmid5008885en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/49657/1/1001330106_ftp.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aja.1001330106en_US
dc.identifier.sourceAmerican Journal of Anatomyen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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