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dc.contributor.authorGomez, Diana M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNewman, Sarah Winansen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-06T18:01:45Z
dc.date.available2007-04-06T18:01:45Z
dc.date.issued1991-12en_US
dc.identifier.citationGomez, Diana M.; Newman, Sarah Winans (1991)."Medial nucleus of the amygdala in the adult Syrian hamster: A quantitative Golgi analysis of gonadal hormonal regulation of neuronal morphology." The Anatomical Record 231(4): 498-509. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49855>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-276Xen_US
dc.identifier.issn1097-0185en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49855
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=1793177&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractThe medial nucleus of the amygdala (Me) processes both chemosensory and hormonal input. In the male Syrian hamster the integrity of this nucleus is essential for normal reproductive behavior. To determine if gonadal steroids modulate neuronal structure in this nucleus, the morphology of Golgi-stained neurons in the anterior and posterior regions of Me were compared in castrated and reproductively intact adult hamsters. In castrated males, neurons in the posterior, but not the anterior, region of Me undergo structural changes, as indicated by a decrease in the mean highest dendritic branch level and mean somal area compared to intact males. To further elucidate the importance of testosterone and its metabolites in maintenance of neuronal structure in the adult, seven groups of male Syrian hamsters were studied. Animals were castrated and received a blank silastic capsule or a capsule filled with either testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, or estradiol. or two capsules containing both metabolites, dihydrotestosterone and estradiol. Two groups of reproductively intact animals were included: brains from one group were processed simultaneously with the castrated and hormone-treated groups (control intact group), and the other group was processed at the beginning of the experiment. Animals were tested for mating behavior and flank glands were measured to test whether the capsules were effective in releasing the hormones into circulation. After a 12-week survival period, the brains were processed with Golgi stain and well-impregnated neurons from the posterior Me were quantitatively analyzed for somal area, highest dendritic branch, total dendritic length, and density of spines. All the measures analyzed revealed a consistent pattern of response to the different gonadal steroids. Castration resulted in a decrease in the mean somal area, the mean highest dendritic branch, and the percentage of neurons with tertiary branch segments. Dihydrotestosterone treatment also resulted in a significant decrease in somal area, mean highest dendritic branch, and percentage of neurons with tertiary dendritic branches. In addition, the total dendritic length and spine density on terminal dendrites were reduced in these brains. The remaining hormone treatment groups were not significantly different from the control group. These results suggest that in orchidectomized male Syrian hamsters, testosterone or its aromatized form, estradiol, but not dihydrotestosterone, is sufficient to maintain the normal morphology of the neurons in the posterior part of the medial nucleus of the amygdala.en_US
dc.format.extent1350451 bytes
dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.publisherWiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Companyen_US
dc.subject.otherLife and Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherCell & Developmental Biologyen_US
dc.titleMedial nucleus of the amygdala in the adult Syrian hamster: A quantitative Golgi analysis of gonadal hormonal regulation of neuronal morphologyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.robotsIndexNoFollowen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelMolecular, Cellular and Developmental Biologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan ; Dept. of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Medical Science Bldg. II, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109–0616en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.identifier.pmid1793177en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/49855/1/1092310412_ftp.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ar.1092310412en_US
dc.identifier.sourceThe Anatomical Recorden_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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