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dc.contributor.authorMistretta, Charlotte M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBradley, Robert M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-06T18:18:36Z
dc.date.available2007-04-06T18:18:36Z
dc.date.issued1983-04-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationMistretta, Charlotte M.; Bradley, Robert M. (1983)."Neural basis of developing salt taste sensation: Response changes in fetal, postnatal, and adult sheep." The Journal of Comparative Neurology 215(2): 199-210. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50018>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-9967en_US
dc.identifier.issn1096-9861en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50018
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=6853773&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractTo learn whether salt taste responses change during mammalian development, we recorded from multifiber preparations of the chorda tympani while stimulating the anterior tongue in sheep fetuses, lambs, and adults. Stimuli were 0.5 M NH4C1, KC1, NaCl, and LiCl, and 0.05–0.75 M concentration series of the first three salts. Ultrastructural studies were made of taste buds at different ages to determine whether morphological elements such as microvilli and tight junctions are present in young fetuses. Substantial changes occur in relative salt taste responses, throughout development. In fetuses that are beginning the last third of gestation, NaCl and LiCl elicit much smaller response magnitudes than NH4C1 and KC1. Throughout the rest of gestation and postnatally, the NaCl and LiCl responses gradually increase in magnitude relative to NH4C1 and KCL In adults, NaCl, LiCl, and NH4Cl all elicit similar response magnitudes and KC1 is less effective as a taste stimulus. At ages when response ratios for the 0.5 M salts are changing, there are no changes in shapes of the response/concentration functions for individual salts. Furthermore, microvilli are present on taste bud cell apices and tight junctions are found between cells in the youngest fetuses studied. Therefore, initial stimulus-receptor membrane contacts are probably similar to those in adults. Our data suggest that different membrane components interact with the various monochloride salts and that taste receptors contain different proportions of these various membrane components at different developmental stages. Therefore young taste bud cells do not have the same salt response characteristics as mature cells, and a changing neural substrate underlies development of salt taste function, both pre- and postnatally.en_US
dc.format.extent3449631 bytes
dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.publisherAlan R. Liss, Inc.en_US
dc.publisherWiley Periodiocals, Inc.en_US
dc.subject.otherLife and Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherNeuroscience, Neurology and Psychiatryen_US
dc.titleNeural basis of developing salt taste sensation: Response changes in fetal, postnatal, and adult sheepen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.robotsIndexNoFollowen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109en_US
dc.identifier.pmid6853773en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/50018/1/902150207_ftp.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cne.902150207en_US
dc.identifier.sourceThe Journal of Comparative Neurologyen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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