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Neuronal cell proliferation and ocular enlargement in black moor goldfish

dc.contributor.authorRaymond, Pamela A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHitchcock, Peter F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPalopoli, Michael F.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-06T18:20:59Z
dc.date.available2007-04-06T18:20:59Z
dc.date.issued1988-10-08en_US
dc.identifier.citationRaymond, Pamela A.; Hitchcock, Peter F.; Palopoli, Michae F. (1988)."Neuronal cell proliferation and ocular enlargement in black moor goldfish." The Journal of Comparative Neurology 276(2): 231-238. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50040>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-9967en_US
dc.identifier.issn1096-9861en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50040
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=3220982&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractThe mechanisms that control cell proliferation in the developing nervous system are not well understood. In larval and adult goldfish addition of new retinal neurons continues as the eye grows, but the factors that modulate the rate of cell proliferation are unknown. The eyes of Black Moors grow excessively during postembryonic life, probably as a direct result of abnormally elevated intraocular pressure. Ocular growth must be partly autonomous in Black Moors because in some individuals the two eyes are very different in size. To determine whether cell proliferation and neuronal cell number in the retina were correlated with size of the eye, we counted dividing neuronal progenitor cells (rod precursors) and mature retinal neurons (ganglion cells) in the retinas of ocularly asymmetric fish. Rod Precursors, which are scattered across the retina in the outer nuclear layer, were labeled with 3 H-thymidine and counted on histological sections processed for autoradiography. Ganglion cells were counted in retinal whole mounts. We found that the total population of dividing rod precursors and the total number of ganglion cells were systematically greater in the large eye compared to the small eye of individual fish. We conclude that control of the rate of neuronal proliferation in the teleost retina is intrinsic to the eye and is probably regulated by the same factors that control ocular growth.en_US
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dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.publisherWiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Companyen_US
dc.subject.otherLife and Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherNeuroscience, Neurology and Psychiatryen_US
dc.titleNeuronal cell proliferation and ocular enlargement in black moor goldfishen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.robotsIndexNoFollowen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartments of Anatomy and Cell Biology The University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-0616 ; Raymond published previously as Pamela R. Johnsen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartments of Anatomy and Cell Biology The University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-0616 ; Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology and Opthalmology, The University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-0616en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartments of Anatomy and Cell Biology The University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-0616en_US
dc.identifier.pmid3220982en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/50040/1/902760207_ftp.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cne.902760207en_US
dc.identifier.sourceThe Journal of Comparative Neurologyen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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