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dc.contributor.authorWerner, Robert A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAlbers, James W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFranzblau, Alfreden_US
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Thomas J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-06T18:33:30Z
dc.date.available2007-04-06T18:33:30Z
dc.date.issued1994-06en_US
dc.identifier.citationWerner, Robert A.; Albers, James W.; Franzblau, Alfred; Armstrong, Thomas J. (1994)."The relationship between body mass index and the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome." Muscle & Nerve 17(6): 632-636. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50161>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0148-639Xen_US
dc.identifier.issn1097-4598en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50161
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=8196706&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractIncreased weignt and, more recently, body mass index (BMI), have been suggested as risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). In an effort to determine the relative risk (RR) of obesity in the development of CTS, 949 patients who had an evaluation of the right upper extremity that included motor and sensory conduction studies of the median and ulnar nerves were reviewed. Of these patients, 261 were diagnosed with a median mononeuropathy at the wrist. Those individuals who were classified as obese (BMI > 29) were 2.5 times more likely than slender individuals (BMI < 20) to be diagnosed with CTS. Forty-three percent of obese women and 32% of obese men had the diagnosis of CTS compared to 21% of slender women and 0% of slender men. © 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.en_US
dc.format.extent499639 bytes
dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.publisherWiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Companyen_US
dc.subject.otherLife and Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherNeuroscience, Neurology and Psychiatryen_US
dc.titleThe relationship between body mass index and the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndromeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.robotsIndexNoFollowen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan ; Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan ; 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Box 0042, University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Ml 48109-0042en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan ; Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan ; Department of Neurology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Environmental and Industrial Health, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Environmental and Industrial Health, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michiganen_US
dc.identifier.pmid8196706en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/50161/1/880170610_ftp.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mus.880170610en_US
dc.identifier.sourceMuscle & Nerveen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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