Locomotor analysis of surface propulsion by three species of reduced-limbed fossorial lizards ( Lerista : Scincidae) from western australia

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dc.contributor.author Gans, Carl en_US
dc.contributor.author Fusari, Margaret en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2007-04-06T18:47:51Z
dc.date.available 2007-04-06T18:47:51Z
dc.date.issued 1994-12 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Gans, Carl; Fusari, Margaret (1994)."Locomotor analysis of surface propulsion by three species of reduced-limbed fossorial lizards ( Lerista : Scincidae) from western australia." Journal of Morphology 222(3): 309-326. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50287> en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0362-2525 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1097-4687 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50287
dc.description.abstract The relatively large, but superficially similar, Lerista macropisthopus , L. connivens , and L. lineopunctulata differ in bodily elongation and limb reduction, inhabit sandy areas, and move under sand. Visual analysis and computer-generated excursion and curvature graphs show that each species moves differently on smooth and rough surfaces, on surfaces with and without nails, and in channels. The reduced-limbed quadruped, Lerista macropisthopus walks frequently, using its four clawed limbs, whenever traction is available. Its undulating body curves uniformly but never generates slide-pushing curves. The biped L. connivens walks with its hindlimbs, although less frequently, and/or oscillates its tail in propelling its relatively stiff, short body. The biped L. lineopunctulata rarely uses its hindlimbs but always undulates body and. tail. It can use single nails in cam-follower progression. L. macropisthopus and L. connivens walk well in channels with rough bottoms, but only L lineopunctulata uses tunnel concertina to travel in channels with smooth bottoms. Friction of body surfaces dragged and of those transmitting propulsive forces is critical to these lizards and explains the division of movement into slow and rapid progression rates. Animals that have clawed limbs, no matter how reduced, use them. Body and tail generally are used differently. The tail may be flipped anteriorly to facilitate concertina. In nail arrays, travel is by simple, never by lateral, undulation. Apparently distinct motor coordination patterns are associated with differences in morphology, habit, and habitat. © 1994 Wiley-Liss, Inc. en_US
dc.format.extent 1754609 bytes
dc.format.extent 3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
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dc.publisher Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company en_US
dc.subject.other Life and Medical Sciences en_US
dc.subject.other Cell & Developmental Biology en_US
dc.title Locomotor analysis of surface propulsion by three species of reduced-limbed fossorial lizards ( Lerista : Scincidae) from western australia en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.rights.robots IndexNoFollow en_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology en_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevel Health Sciences en_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevel Science en_US
dc.description.peerreviewed Peer Reviewed en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum Department of Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 ; Department of Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz California 95064 en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurl http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/50287/1/1052220308_ftp.pdf en_US
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmor.1052220308 en_US
dc.identifier.source Journal of Morphology en_US
dc.owningcollname Interdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed
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