Cortical blindness: Etiology, diagnosis, and prognosis

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dc.contributor.author Aldrich, Michael S. en_US
dc.contributor.author Alessi, Anthony G. en_US
dc.contributor.author Beck, Roy W. en_US
dc.contributor.author Gilman, Sid en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2007-04-06T18:51:11Z
dc.date.available 2007-04-06T18:51:11Z
dc.date.issued 1987-02 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Aldrich, Michael S.; Alessi, Anthony G.; Beck, Roy W.; Gilman, Sid (1987)."Cortical blindness: Etiology, diagnosis, and prognosis." Annals of Neurology 21(2): 149-158. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50318> en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0364-5134 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1531-8249 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50318
dc.identifier.uri http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=3827223&dopt=citation en_US
dc.description.abstract We examined 15 patients with cortical blindness, reviewed the records of 10 others, and compared these 25 patients to those in previous studies of cortical blindness. Although cerebrovascular disease was the most common cause in our series, surgery, particularly cardiac surgery, and cerebral angiography were also major causes. Only 3 patients denied their blindness, although 4 others were unaware of their visual loss. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were performed during the period of blindness in 20 patients and all recordings were abnormal, with absent alpha rhythm. Visual evoked potentials recorded during blindness were abnormal in 15 of 19 patients, but did not correlate with the severity of visual loss or with outcome. Bioccipital lucencies were found in computed tomographic (CT) scans of 14 patients; none of the 14 regained good vision. Recovery of vision was poor in all 8 patients who had a spontaneous stroke, but fair or good in 11 of the other 17 patients. Prognosis was best in patients under the age of 40 years, in those without a history of hypertension or diabetes mellitus, and in those without associated cognitive, language, or memory impairments. We conclude that (1) the prognosis in cortical blindness is poor when caused by stroke; (2) EEGs are more useful than visual evoked potentials for diagnosis; and (3) bioccipital abnormalities shown on CT scan are associated with a poor prognosis. en_US
dc.format.extent 833396 bytes
dc.format.extent 3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype text/plain
dc.publisher Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company en_US
dc.subject.other Life and Medical Sciences en_US
dc.subject.other Neuroscience, Neurology, and Psychiatry en_US
dc.title Cortical blindness: Etiology, diagnosis, and prognosis en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.rights.robots IndexNoFollow en_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Psychiatry en_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevel Health Sciences en_US
dc.description.peerreviewed Peer Reviewed en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum Departments of Neurology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI ; Department of Neurology, 1920/0316 Taubman Center, University of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, MI 48109–0316 en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum Departments of Neurology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum Departments of Neurosurgery, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum Departments of Ophthalmology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI en_US
dc.identifier.pmid 3827223 en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurl http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/50318/1/410210207_ftp.pdf en_US
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.410210207 en_US
dc.identifier.source Annals of Neurology en_US
dc.owningcollname Interdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed
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