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dc.contributor.authorGilman, Siden_US
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Kenneth M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKoeppe, Robert A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBerent, Stanleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKluin, Karen J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorModell, Jack G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKroll, Phillipen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrunberg, James A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-06T18:53:32Z
dc.date.available2007-04-06T18:53:32Z
dc.date.issued1990-12en_US
dc.identifier.citationGilman, Sid; Adams, Kenneth; Koeppe, Robert A.; Berent, Stanley; Kluin, Karen J.; Modell, Jack G.; Kroll, Phillip; Brunberg, James A. (1990)."Cerebellar and frontal hypometabolism in alcoholic cerebellar degeneration studied with positron emission tomography." Annals of Neurology 28(6): 775-785. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50340>en_US
dc.identifier.issn0364-5134en_US
dc.identifier.issn1531-8249en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50340
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=2285264&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractLocal cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied utilizing 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography (PET) in 14 chronically alcohol-dependent patients and 8 normal control subjects of similar age and sex. Nine of the 14 patients (Group A) had clinical signs of alcoholic cerebellar degeneration, and the remaining 5 (Group B) did not have signs of alcoholic cerebellar degeneration. PET studies of Group A revealed significantly decreased local cerebral metabolic rates for glucose in the superior cerebellar vermis in comparison with the normal control subjects. Group B did not show decreased rates in the cerebellum. Both Groups A and B showed decreased local cerebral metabolic rates for glucose bilaterally in the medial frontal area of the cerebral cortex in comparison with the normal control subjects. The severity of the clinical neurological impairment was significantly correlated with the degree of hypometabolism in both the superior cerebellar vermis and the medial frontal region of the cerebral cortex. The degree of atrophy detected in computed tomography scans was significantly correlated with local cerebral metabolic rates in the medial frontal area of the cerebral cortex, but not in the cerebellum. The data indicate that hypometabolism in the superior cerebellar vermis closely follows clinical symptomatology in patients with alcoholic cerebellar degeneration, and does not occur in alcohol-dependent patients without clinical evidence of cerebellar dysfunction. Hypometabolism in the medial frontal region of the cerebral cortex is a prominent finding in alcohol-dependent patients with or without alcoholic cerebellar degeneration.en_US
dc.format.extent2090310 bytes
dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.publisherWiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Companyen_US
dc.subject.otherLife and Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherNeuroscience, Neurology, and Psychiatryen_US
dc.titleCerebellar and frontal hypometabolism in alcoholic cerebellar degeneration studied with positron emission tomographyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.robotsIndexNoFollowen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelPsychiatryen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelHealth Sciencesen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Neurology, The University of Michigan, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI ; Department of Neurology, The University of Michigan, 1914 Taubman Center, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0316en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Psychiatry, The University of Michigan, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MIen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Internal Medicine, The University of Michigan, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MIen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Neurology, The University of Michigan, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI ; Department of Psychiatry, The University of Michigan, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MIen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, The University of Michigan, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MIen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Psychiatry, The University of Michigan, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MIen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Psychiatry, The University of Michigan, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MIen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Neurology, The University of Michigan, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI ; Department of Radiology, The University of Michigan, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MIen_US
dc.identifier.pmid2285264en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/50340/1/410280608_ftp.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.410280608en_US
dc.identifier.sourceAnnals of Neurologyen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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