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RESPOND: a residential oil spill in St. Bernard Parish, LA

dc.contributor.authorFoo, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorGott, Heather
dc.contributor.authorHaamen, Meredith
dc.contributor.authorPerry, Suzanne
dc.contributor.advisorBryant, Bunyan
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-18T14:35:29Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONen
dc.date.available2007-04-18T14:35:29Z
dc.date.issued2007-04-30
dc.date.submitted2007-04
dc.identifier139en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50477
dc.description.abstractBefore Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, New Orleans and surrounding communities were working successfully to address contamination concerns. Citizens were working to beautify St. Bernard Parish, protect wetlands and wildlife, close Mississippi River Gulf Outlet, and monitor air quality. Now, as people rebuild their lives post-hurricane, they are meeting new environmental challenges. Residents are working to win safe yards, improved air quality, and safe drinking water. Katrina and Rita resurrected old pollution problems in New Orleans, but they also gave St. Bernard Parish lagniappe by swirling a million gallons of crude into the mix. The Murphy Oil spill was the biggest residential oil spill in U.S. history. The hurricanes swept up preexisting contaminants and combined them with oil, swirling the mixture through churches, gardens, schools, and living rooms. Then the water receded, leaving behind a long list of contamination problems. Parish residents, who were dealing with more immediate concerns like housing and insurance, were concerned with the contamination but had little energy to deal with its immediate effects. We surveyed over 200 parish residents, asking how they get their news about contamination and which issues are of the greatest concern. We found that 43 percent of parish residents felt that they had not received the information they need to make informed decisions regarding health risks potentially caused by Hurricane Katrina. While no one can tell residents with absolute certainty whether it is “safe” to return to their homes, we created this handbook in an attempt to assist parish residents in making decisions about contamination issues.en
dc.format.extent4606976 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectHurrican Katrinaen
dc.subjectResidential Oil Spillen
dc.titleRESPOND: a residential oil spill in St. Bernard Parish, LAen
dc.typeProjecten
dc.description.thesisdegreenameMaster of Scienceen
dc.description.thesisdegreedisciplineSchool of Natural Resources and Environmenten
dc.description.thesisdegreegrantorUniversity of Michiganen
dc.contributor.committeememberHockman, Elaine
dc.contributor.committeememberButton, Gregory
dc.identifier.uniqnamekfooen
dc.identifier.uniqnamehgotten
dc.identifier.uniqnamemhaamenen
dc.identifier.uniqnameyarrowen
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/50477/1/Compiled_noPhotos_Apr16.docen_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/50477/5/UofM_FCspineBC_LO[1].pdfen_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/50477/4/UofMpageslo.pdfen_US
dc.owningcollnameDissertations and Theses (Ph.D. and Master's)


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