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Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Conservation of Terrestrial Mammals

dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Eila Kathleen
dc.contributor.advisorLow, Bobbi
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-20T13:53:52Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONen
dc.date.available2007-04-20T13:53:52Z
dc.date.issued2007-04-30
dc.date.submitted2007-04
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50492
dc.description.abstractAs evidence of the threat of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is mounting, there is a need to revise our research efforts. EDCs present a novel challenge to the evolved endocrine processes of both humans and wildlife species. Biases in past research allowed for the formation of gaps in out knowledge concerning the identity and effects of EDCs. In order to correct these biases we must employ experimental models and explore a wider range of contaminants, species, effects, and exposure regimes. Here I present an example of a well-understood experimental model that fulfills the deficiencies left by the biases: sheep. A series of experiments conducted in both female and male sheep demonstrate that exposure to steroid hormones during development can alter behavior without causing any noticeable external effects. These alterations to behavior decreased reproductive fitness compared to controls, illustrating the need for the inclusion of behavior in surveys for EDC detection. This, and other experimental models, will begin to help us explore the full range of EDC effects in both humans and wildlife species.en
dc.format.extent404480 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectEndocrine Disrupting Chemicalsen
dc.titleEndocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Conservation of Terrestrial Mammalsen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.thesisdegreenameMaster of Scienceen
dc.description.thesisdegreedisciplineSchool of Natural Resources and Environmenten
dc.description.thesisdegreegrantorUniversity of Michiganen
dc.contributor.committeememberLee, Theresa
dc.contributor.committeememberFoufopolous, Johannes
dc.identifier.uniqnameekrobertsen
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/50492/1/EKR Thesis 04172007.docen_US
dc.owningcollnameDissertations and Theses (Ph.D. and Master's)


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