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dc.contributor.authorEidietis, Lauraen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-05-01T19:29:18Z
dc.date.available2007-05-01T19:29:18Z
dc.date.issued2006-04-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationEidietis, Laura (4)."The tactile-stimulated startle response of tadpoles: acceleration performance and its relationship to the anatomy of wood frog ( Rana sylvatica ), bullfrog ( Rana catesbeiana ), and American toad ( Bufo americanus ) tadpoles." Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Comparative Experimental Biology 305A: 348-362. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50631>en_US
dc.identifier.issn1548-8969en_US
dc.identifier.issn1552-499Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50631
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=16493644&dopt=citationen_US
dc.description.abstractI described the tactile-stimulated startle response (TSR) of wood frog ( Rana sylvatica ), bullfrog ( Rana catesbeiana ), and American toad ( Bufo americanus ) tadpoles. One purpose was to rank species in terms of maximum acceleration performance. Also, I tested whether anatomical indicators of performance potential were predictive of realized performance. TSRs were elicited in a laboratory setting, filmed at 250 Hz, and digitally analyzed. TSRs began with two, initial body curls during which tadpoles showed a broad spectrum of movement patterns. TSR performance was quantified by maximum linear acceleration and maximum rotational acceleration of the head/body, both of which tended to occur immediately upon initiation of motion (<0.012 sec into the response). Bullfrog tadpoles had higher maximum acceleration than the other species, but other interspecific differences were not significant. The species' rank order for the anatomical indicator of linear acceleration potential was bullfrog>wood frog>American toad. The species' rank order for the anatomical indicator of rotational acceleration potential was bullfrog>wood frog=American toad. Thus, the anatomical indicators roughly predicted the rank order of interspecific average performance. However, the anatomical indicators did not correlate with individual tadpole performance. Variability in behavioral patterns may obscure the connection between anatomy and performance. This is seen in the current lack of intraspecific correlation between a morphological indicator of acceleration capacity and acceleration performance. J. Exp. Zool. 305A:348–362, 2006 . © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_US
dc.format.extent264179 bytes
dc.format.extent3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.publisherWiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Companyen_US
dc.subject.otherLife and Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.otherCell & Developmental Biologyen_US
dc.titleThe tactile-stimulated startle response of tadpoles: acceleration performance and its relationship to the anatomy of wood frog ( Rana sylvatica ), bullfrog ( Rana catesbeiana ), and American toad ( Bufo americanus ) tadpolesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.robotsIndexNoFollowen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Revieweden_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumDepartment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1048 ; Eastern Michigan University, Biology Department, Ypsilanti, MI 48197en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16493644en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/50631/1/269_ftp.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jez.a.269en_US
dc.identifier.sourceJournal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Comparative Experimental Biologyen_US
dc.owningcollnameInterdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed


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