Does Hurthle cell lesion/neoplasm predict malignancy more than follicular lesion/neoplasm on thyroid fine-needle aspiration?

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dc.contributor.author Pu, Robert T. en_US
dc.contributor.author Yang, Jack en_US
dc.contributor.author Wasserman, Patricia G. en_US
dc.contributor.author Bhuiya, Tawfiqul en_US
dc.contributor.author Griffith, Kent A. en_US
dc.contributor.author Michael, Claire W. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2007-05-02T14:20:07Z
dc.date.available 2007-05-02T14:20:07Z
dc.date.issued 2006-05 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Pu, Robert T.; Yang, Jack; Wasserman, Patricia G.; Bhuiya, Tawfiqul; Griffith, Kent A.; Michael, Claire W. (2006). "Does Hurthle cell lesion/neoplasm predict malignancy more than follicular lesion/neoplasm on thyroid fine-needle aspiration?." Diagnostic Cytopathology 34(5): 330-334. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50686> en_US
dc.identifier.issn 8755-1039 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1097-0339 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/50686
dc.identifier.uri http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=16604553&dopt=citation en_US
dc.description.abstract Thyroid fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is a standard procedure for the clinical triage of thyroid nodules. The diagnosis of an adequately sampled thyroid FNA is generally grouped into three categories: benign, malignant, and indeterminate. The latter group usually includes follicular neoplasm, follicular lesion, and sometimes a more specific diagnosis such as Hurthle cell neoplasm or follicular lesion/neoplasm with Hurthle cell change. Whether a FNA diagnosis of Hurthle cell lesion/neoplasm (HLN) denotes a worse clinical outcome than follicular lesion/neoplasm (FLN) remains controversial. A cohort of 303 thyroid FNA cases with follow-up thyroidectomy in our institutes was identified, with the follow-up excision diagnosis compared to the FNA diagnosis in order to address this issue. Of this cohort, 87 cases had an FNA diagnosis of HLN while 216 cases had a diagnosis of FLN. Upon excision, the FNA diagnosis of HLN group had 14 cases of goiter/nodular hyperplasia (16%), 46 cases of adenoma (12 follicular adenoma (14%) and 34 cases of Hurthle cell adenoma (39%)), and 27 cases of carcinoma (31%, 12 papillary carcinoma and 15 Hurthle cell carcinoma). The FLN group had 74 cases of goiter/nodular hyperplasia (34.3%), 8 cases of Hashimoto thyroiditis (3.7%), 73 cases of follicular adenoma (33.8%), one case of granular cell tumor, and 60 cases of carcinoma (27.8%, 46 papillary carcinoma, 12 follicular carcinoma, and 1 Hurthle cell carcinoma and 1 parathyroid carcinoma) upon excision. There is no significant difference in predicting cancer between the two cytology diagnosis groups (HLN versus FLN, 31% versus 27.8%, P = 0.5771). When sorting all the cases by the surgical diagnosis, while comparable for age at diagnosis, the cancer group having the higher proportion of male patients than the non-cancer group (28.7% versus 16.7%, P = 0.0259). Hurthle cell carcinoma patients are typically older than patients with other cancer diagnoses (59 versus 44, P = 0.0077). Our results suggest that an FNA diagnosis of HLN does not predict more malignancy than FLN. Males and older patients with a HLN FNA diagnosis carry a higher risk of Hurthle cell carcinoma upon thyroidectomy. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2006;34:330–334. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. en_US
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dc.format.extent 3118 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype text/plain
dc.publisher Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company en_US
dc.subject.other Life and Medical Sciences en_US
dc.subject.other Cancer Research, Oncology and Pathology en_US
dc.title Does Hurthle cell lesion/neoplasm predict malignancy more than follicular lesion/neoplasm on thyroid fine-needle aspiration? en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.rights.robots IndexNoFollow en_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevel Pathology en_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevel Health Sciences en_US
dc.description.peerreviewed Peer Reviewed en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan ; Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Room 2G332/BOX 0054, Ann Arbor, MI en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum Biostatistic Unit, Cancer Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationum Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Long island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, New York en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Long island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, New York en_US
dc.contributor.affiliationother Long island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, New York en_US
dc.identifier.pmid 16604553 en_US
dc.description.bitstreamurl http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/50686/1/20440_ftp.pdf en_US
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dc.20440 en_US
dc.identifier.source Diagnostic Cytopathology en_US
dc.owningcollname Interdisciplinary and Peer-Reviewed
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