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dc.contributor.authorSmrchek, Jerry C.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialBlack Riveren_US
dc.coverage.spatialMaple River - West Branchen_US
dc.coverage.spatialEast Point - Douglas Lakeen_US
dc.coverage.spatialHook Point - Douglas Lakeen_US
dc.coverage.spatialGrapevine Point - Douglas Lakeen_US
dc.coverage.spatialOden Creeken_US
dc.coverage.spatialCrooked Lake - Emmet Co.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialMullett Creek - Cheboygan Co.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialMunro Lakeen_US
dc.coverage.spatialOcqueoc Lakeen_US
dc.coverage.spatialOcqueoc Riveren_US
dc.coverage.spatialLake Paradiseen_US
dc.coverage.spatialCarp River - Emmet Co.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialLarks Lake - Emmet Co.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialGrapevine Point - Douglas Lakeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-14T17:26:03Z
dc.date.available2007-06-14T17:26:03Z
dc.date.issued1968en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/52469
dc.description.abstract1. The general systematics of the bryozoa found in the Northern Lower Michgian area was studied for a seond summer. 2. Six species of bryozoa were collected from eighteen localities, which were in the order of greatest abundance first: Plumatella repens, Fredericella sultana, Cristatella mucedo, Paludicella articulata, Plumatella fruticosa, and Plumatella emarginata. 3. The general eclogy of these bryozoa are discussed in general. 4. The first occurrence of Plumatella fruticosa from Cheboygan County is reported here. 5. The problem of distinguishing Plumatella repens from P. emarginata is discussed. 6. The evolution of the bryozoa is speculated upon. A phoronid is probable as being ancestral to the bryozoa. 7. A solution to the problem of the large numbers of floatoblasts present in the plankton of Douglas Lake is offered. 8. The synonomy and world-wide distribution of the bryozoa found in the continental United States is discussed. 9. As a result of measuring natural rates of colony growth at two localities, factors such as predation, physical disturbances, and limiting factors such as available substrate may limit growth. 10. Growth is exponential in the bryozoa studied, that is, unrestricted growth until a factor (s) become limiting. 11. Doubling rates of the polypides of P. repens varied from 3.2 to 4.5 days. 12. There is some evidence that Plumatella fruticosa has a much smaller natural rate of growth than Plumatella repens. 13. A key to the Bryozoa of the Douglas Lake region is included. 14. Plumatella emarginata was found for the first time in an inland stream of Emmet County.en_US
dc.format.extent3210506 bytes
dc.format.extent3144 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.relation.haspartDiagram or Illustrationen_US
dc.relation.haspartGraphen_US
dc.relation.haspartTable of Numbersen_US
dc.subjectZoology Researchen_US
dc.titleThe systematics of the Bryozoa (Ectoprocta) found in northern lower Michigan.en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resource and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumBiological Station, University of Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/52469/1/901.pdfen_US
dc.description.filedescriptionDescription of 901.pdf : Access restricted to on-site users at the U-M Biological Station.en_US
dc.owningcollnameBiological Station, University of Michigan (UMBS)


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