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dc.contributor.authorMott, Thomas C.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUMBS Campusen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-14T19:41:23Z
dc.date.available2007-06-14T19:41:23Z
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/53444
dc.description.abstractThe presence of the smooth green snake, Opheodrys vernalis in Cheboygan County, Michigan was first noted by Ruthven in 1912. Ruthven's original and Wright's (1957) updated description of the range of O. vernalis show that Douglas Lake in Cheboygan County, Michigan is near the northern limit of this snake's distribution. Various aspects of the life history of Opheodrys vernalis have been described by several authors. Langlois (1924) was among the first to describe the oviparous reproductive process of this snake. Blanchard (1928, 1922) gave detailed descriptions of the oviposition process, eggs, incubation times, and young of O. vernalis. Lueth (1941), and Cowles and Bogert (1944) were among the first to show that environmental temperatures do affect snakes and reptiles. It was Cowles and Bogert (1944) who were the first to demonstrate that certain reptiles do maintain and regulate their body temperatures by thermal exchange with the environment. Brattstrom (1965) summarizes the work of several researchers and identifies the several thermoregulatory categories, and the physiological and behavioral mechanisms employed by a wide variety of reptiles. The question has been raised by Packard, Tracy, and Roth (1977): and by Sexton, and Claypool (1978); of how an ectothermal oviparious reptile, such as Opheodrys vernalis, can exist in cool northern climates when much of their life history depends upon suitable temperature. In their paper, Sexton and Claypool concluded that part of the answer lies in the selection of nest sites, having maximum and minimum temperatures consistently above shaded air temperature, the mean maximum being 28 C and mean minimum 18 C. The purpose of this project was to add further information to the partial answer provided by Sexton and Claypool. The questions that I have attempted to answer are: does the green snake, Opheodrys vernalis, have a preference of habitat based upon temperature; is there any relationship between habitat and body temperature; and, is there any relationship between these and reproductive success?en_US
dc.format.extent911612 bytes
dc.format.extent3144 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.relation.haspartGraphen_US
dc.relation.haspartTable of Numbersen_US
dc.subjectAnimal Behavioren_US
dc.titleTemperature, habitat selection, and egg incubation times in the green snake, Opheodrys vernalis.en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resource and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumBiological Station, University of Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/53444/1/1878.pdfen_US
dc.description.filedescriptionDescription of 1878.pdf : Access restricted to on-site users at the U-M Biological Station.en_US
dc.owningcollnameBiological Station, University of Michigan (UMBS)


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