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dc.contributor.authorDe Flon, Sarahen_US
dc.contributor.authorPaxton, Deben_US
dc.coverage.spatialUMBS Stationen_US
dc.coverage.spatialGreenstar Meadowen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-14T22:17:57Z
dc.date.available2007-06-14T22:17:57Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/54511
dc.description.abstractThe predation of ground nesting birds has been extensively studied, and has been researched on UMBS property. Different habitats produce different rates of predation. In our study, simulated ground nests were placed on UMBS property in order to study both predation rates and predator identity. Simulated nests were created, with eggs and fish used as bait. We expected edge sites to have higher degrees of predatio than meadow or forest sites, and racoons to be likely predators. Nest sites were located at Green Star meadow and along a transect at Riggsville Road. A camera system designed to photograph predators with a trip wire trigger was used. The study was conducted from 3 August 1994 to 8 August 1994. Sixteen camers were used. Data was taken on tripped, predated, and tripped/predated cameras. Rates of predation were found to be higher along forest edge, followed by forest and then meadow interior. Predation rates were compared using percentages to compensate for unequal numbers of cameras in each habitat. All of the predators recorded were racoons, except for two opossum visits. Since ground nesting birds have been documented in the area, it is reasonable to asume predation actually occurs. Studies of predation in the Northern Michigan area, specifically Southern (1980) document mammal predation, and predation seems to affect both reproductive success and nestling mortality. Several factors can influence predation prates, including forest density and meadow shrub density (Leingruber, McShea and Rappole 1994, Gregg, Crawford, Drut and Delong 1994). Because predation rates were higher along forest edge and forest, we suspect the predators were more likely to inhabit the forest. Because our main predators were raccoons, we concluded that more human friendly species were likely to predate our nests; predation rates differed for each habitat and this may be correlated with the degree of human disturbance in each area. Weather may have also been a factor concerning nest predation patterns. Because an opposum visited our nests, the first documented on UMBS property, we speculate this may signify invasion of a species due to migration. The study was successful, obtaining informative data, but may have been more conclusive if executed over a longer time period.en_US
dc.format.extent984187 bytes
dc.format.extent3144 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.relation.haspartDiagram or Illustrationen_US
dc.relation.haspartGraphen_US
dc.relation.haspartMapen_US
dc.subjectConservation Biologyen_US
dc.subject.classificationPine Woodlandsen_US
dc.subject.otherVERTEBRATESen_US
dc.subject.otherMAMMALSen_US
dc.subject.otherPREDATIONen_US
dc.subject.otherPHOTOGRAPHYen_US
dc.subject.otherFORESTen_US
dc.subject.otherFRAGMENTATIONen_US
dc.subject.otherBIRDSen_US
dc.subject.otherNESTINGen_US
dc.subject.otherNESTSen_US
dc.titleNest predation, predation rates and predator identity on UMBS property.en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resource and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumBiological Station, University of Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/54511/1/2950.pdfen_US
dc.description.filedescriptionDescription of 2950.pdf : Access restricted to on-site users at the U-M Biological Station.en_US
dc.owningcollnameBiological Station, University of Michigan (UMBS)


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