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dc.contributor.authorEckert, Danielen_US
dc.coverage.spatialHook Point - Douglas Lakeen_US
dc.coverage.spatialMaple River - East Branchen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUMBS Stationen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-14T22:18:22Z
dc.date.available2007-06-14T22:18:22Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/54514
dc.description.abstractOptimal foraging theory examines predator-prey relationships with respect to energy costs and energy gains. It predicts that organisms should attempt to maximize gains and minimize costs. An area of modest research is how this theory applies to central place foragers, organisms that carry their prey back to a centrally located nest, burrow or in our case lodge. However, little research has been done on central place foraging animals which do not exceed their prey in size. Studies investigating this particular interaction have primarily focused on the beaver, presumably due to its observable and quantifiable foraging of large, discrete prey items (trees). This study examines central place foraging techniques employed by beavers at two locations (one lake and one stream) in northern lower Michigan. We found that beavers exhibited a preference for various tree genera, depending upon the location. In addition, significantly greater percentages of trees per unit area were cut closer to the shorelines. However, no correlation was found between the diameter of tree taken and distance from the shoreline within a particular genus. Finally, beavers exhibited increased selectivity in tree size as distance increased. Results were compared with previous studies and were evaluated with respect to the predictions made by optimal and central place foraging theories and their associated models.en_US
dc.format.extent440134 bytes
dc.format.extent3144 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.relation.haspartGraphen_US
dc.relation.haspartTable of Numbersen_US
dc.subjectGeneral Ecologyen_US
dc.titleOptimal central-place foraging by beavers, Castor canadensis, in northern lower Michigan.en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resource and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumBiological Station, University of Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/54514/1/2953.pdfen_US
dc.description.filedescriptionDescription of 2953.pdf : Access restricted to on-site users at the U-M Biological Station.en_US
dc.owningcollnameBiological Station, University of Michigan (UMBS)


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