Show simple item record

Home range size in Great Lakes Piping Plovers: implications for conservation and management.

dc.contributor.authorShutt, Nicole M.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialGrand Marais Areaen_US
dc.coverage.spatialVermilion Areaen_US
dc.coverage.spatialPointe Aux Chenesen_US
dc.coverage.spatialWaugoshance Pointen_US
dc.coverage.spatialWilderness State Parken_US
dc.coverage.spatialSturgeon Bayen_US
dc.coverage.spatialCross Village Areaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-14T22:43:23Z
dc.date.available2007-06-14T22:43:23Z
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/54694
dc.description.abstractThe Great Lakes population of Piping Plovers is the smallest and most heavily managed breeding assemblage of this endangered shorebird. As plover nesting beaches are increasingly threatened by development, conservation of adequate shoreline is essential to the survival of these birds. I hypothesized that plovers nesting in areas with high levels of human disturbance (measured by counting footprints along shoreline transects) would have larger home ranges than plovers nesting where such disturbance was minimal. I examined the home range sizes of eleven breeding pairs of Piping Plovers in Michigan (through two estimation methods), and the data support my hypothesis. Although there is much variation in the home ranges (plus the more shoreline available to the birds, the more they will utilize), the level of human disturbance was found to the most significant predictor of size. The positions of all plovers were plotted on composite aerial videography images and are included in the Appendix. In addition, the implications of these findings for conservation and management of Piping Plovers are discussed.en_US
dc.format.extent329393 bytes
dc.format.extent3144 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.relation.haspartGraphen_US
dc.relation.haspartMapen_US
dc.relation.haspartTable of Numbersen_US
dc.subjectUndergraduate Research Exper.en_US
dc.subject.classificationSand-gravel Beachen_US
dc.subject.classificationCobble Beachen_US
dc.subject.otherBIRDSen_US
dc.subject.otherPLOVERSen_US
dc.subject.otherCHARADRIUSen_US
dc.subject.otherHOMEen_US
dc.subject.otherRANGEen_US
dc.subject.otherBEHAVIORen_US
dc.subject.otherPOPULATIONen_US
dc.subject.otherMANAGEMENTen_US
dc.subject.otherENDANGEREDen_US
dc.subject.otherBREEDINGen_US
dc.subject.otherBIOLOGYen_US
dc.subject.otherHUMANen_US
dc.subject.otherSHOREBIRDSen_US
dc.subject.otherREPRODUCTIVEen_US
dc.subject.otherSUCCESSen_US
dc.subject.otherSHORELINEen_US
dc.titleHome range size in Great Lakes Piping Plovers: implications for conservation and management.en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resource and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumBiological Station, University of Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/54694/1/3135.pdfen_US
dc.description.filedescriptionDescription of 3135.pdf : Access restricted to on-site users at the U-M Biological Station.en_US
dc.owningcollnameBiological Station, University of Michigan (UMBS)


Files in this item

Show simple item record

Accessibility: If you are unable to use this file in its current format, please select the Contact Us link and we can modify it to make it more accessible to you.