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The comparison of two temporally separated populations in Emmet County, Michigan: higher survivorship in Caucasian than Native American females.

dc.contributor.authorDantzer, Emilyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-14T23:08:45Z
dc.date.available2007-06-14T23:08:45Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/54877
dc.description.abstractDemography is a division of ecology that provides statistical information for a population of interest. Demography uses life tables to display how a population is age-structured and survivorship curves to compare rates of mortality between populations. The populations in interest in this study are Caucasian and Native American females. The purpose of this experimental study was to determine if there is a difference in mortality rates in Native American and Caucasian females in two time periods, 1900-1945 and 1946-2000, in Emmet County, northern lower Michigan, USA. I surveyed five cemeteries in Emmet County and recorded the year of death and age of death for Caucasian and Native American females. I divided the data into two time intervals and constructed life table and survivorship curves for each ethnic group in each time period. I performed Chi-squared Tests of Independence and t-tests on the mean age-specific mortality rates. The survivorship rates are statistically significantly different for Native American and Caucasian females in the 1900-1945 interval (X2 = 39.71, df = 2, P<0.05) and in the 1946-2000 interval (X2 = 17.21, df = 2, P<0.05). Female Native Americans were found to have a higher mortality rate than Caucasian females in the 1900-1945 period and in the 1946-2000. The mean age-specific mortality rate for Caucasian females in 1900-1945 is greater than in 1946-2000 (t = 1.363325, df = 42, P<0.05). The mean age-specific mortality rate for Native American females in the 1900-1945 was also greater than in 1946-2000 (t = 0.933101, df=42, P<0.05). There are several health factors that can explain the trend of lower survivorshiop of Native American females in relation to Caucasian females, such as their higher rates of chronic diseases, excessive consumption of alcohol and tobacco, poor health care system, and a high rate of infant mortality.en_US
dc.format.extent577171 bytes
dc.format.extent3144 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.relation.haspartGraphen_US
dc.relation.haspartTable of Numbersen_US
dc.subjectGeneral Ecologyen_US
dc.subject.otherHUMANen_US
dc.subject.otherPOPULATIONSen_US
dc.subject.otherLIFEen_US
dc.subject.otherTABLESen_US
dc.subject.otherEXPECTANCYen_US
dc.subject.otherSURVIVORSHIPen_US
dc.subject.otherRACEen_US
dc.titleThe comparison of two temporally separated populations in Emmet County, Michigan: higher survivorship in Caucasian than Native American females.en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resource and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumBiological Station, University of Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/54877/1/3318.pdfen_US
dc.description.filedescriptionDescription of 3318.pdf : Access restricted to on-site users at the U-M Biological Station.en_US
dc.owningcollnameBiological Station, University of Michigan (UMBS)


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