Show simple item record

Demographic analysis of survivorship between Caucasian and Native American females in two temporally separated human populations buried in Emmet County, northern lower Michigan.

dc.contributor.authorHendershot, Sarahen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-14T23:10:32Z
dc.date.available2007-06-14T23:10:32Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/54890
dc.description.abstractA powerful tool for describing life patterns of individuals is the analysis of population demography. This study examined demographics for two temporally separated populations buried in six cemeteries throughout Emmet County, northern lower Michigan. The populations were defined as: (1) females who died between 1900 and 1945 inclusively, and (2) females who died between 1946 and 2000. I examined differences in survivorship between Caucasian and Native American females within the three separate populations, and differences in age-specific mortality rates for females of each ethnic group through time, across the populations. I determined age at death from the dates of birth and death marked on individual tombstones, and then recorded these data for each poulation separately by ethnic group for 1016 people. From the number of deaths observed in certain predetermined age intervals I constructed a life table. Both populations of females showed a statistically significant difference in the distribution of deaths (dx) between Caucasians and Native Americans (X2 df = 2, P < 0.05). These results concur with previous observations of other human populations. They are a result of both genetic and environmental factors such as hormonal differences, lifestyle, and access to medical care. For both Caucasian and Native American females, there was no difference in average age-specific mortality rates across the two populations (t Test df = 2, P > 0.05). Biological and evolutionary constraints on the human species may naturally limit increases in survivorship of human populations through time. Further studies involving fecundity and genetic variation in humans may provide stronger evidence for this hypothesis.en_US
dc.format.extent720909 bytes
dc.format.extent3144 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.relation.haspartGraphen_US
dc.relation.haspartTable of Numbersen_US
dc.subjectGeneral Ecologyen_US
dc.subject.otherLIFEen_US
dc.subject.otherTABLESen_US
dc.subject.otherSURVIVORSHIPen_US
dc.titleDemographic analysis of survivorship between Caucasian and Native American females in two temporally separated human populations buried in Emmet County, northern lower Michigan.en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resource and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumBiological Station, University of Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/54890/1/3331.pdfen_US
dc.description.filedescriptionDescription of 3331.pdf : Access restricted to on-site users at the U-M Biological Station.en_US
dc.owningcollnameBiological Station, University of Michigan (UMBS)


Files in this item

Show simple item record

Accessibility: If you are unable to use this file in its current format, please select the Contact Us link and we can modify it to make it more accessible to you.