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Caddisfly (Trichoptera) larvae distribution in the Maple River.

dc.contributor.authorMondejar, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorPotvin, Lynetteen_US
dc.contributor.authorSong, Noh-Hyun Monicaen_US
dc.contributor.authorZipkin, Eliseen_US
dc.coverage.spatialMaple Riveren_US
dc.coverage.spatialMaple River - East Branchen_US
dc.coverage.spatialMaple River - West Branchen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-14T23:21:54Z
dc.date.available2007-06-14T23:21:54Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/54972
dc.description.abstractCaddisflies of the three superfamilies, Spicipalpia, Integripalpia, and Annulipalpia, produce cases during an aquatic larval stage to aid in their growth and development. The distribution of these cases in rivers and streams is dependent on the interplay of biotic and abiotic factors. In our study we focused on several of these factors that affect caddisfly larval distribution including water depth and velocity, algae cover, and rock surface area. We also looked at case location on individual rocks (upstream versus downstream, and top versus bottom). To study these differences, we examined caddisfly distribution in three sections of the Maple River: the East Branch, the West Branch, and the Main Branch south of Lake Kathleen where the East and West branches merge. We found a significant difference in distribution among the three sites with Spicipalpia and Integripalpia preferring the West Branch and Annulipalpia preferring the East and Main branches. We found no difference in the mean water depth between rocks found with caddisfly larvae and rocks found without larvae. However, we observed a difference in the water velocity flowing over rocks with Spicipalpia and Integripalpia present, which were more common in fast waters. Annulipalpia and Integripalpia appeared more frequently on rocks with high algae cover while Spicipalpia were more common on rocks with low and medium coverage. We also observed that all three sunerfamilies were more prevalent on the tops of rocks and that both Spicipalpia and Annulipalpia were more frequently found on the upstream side. We believe that a larger sample size would help to further distinguish the differences in distribution of caddisfly larvae.en_US
dc.format.extent427617 bytes
dc.format.extent3144 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.relation.haspartDiagram or Illustrationen_US
dc.relation.haspartGraphen_US
dc.relation.haspartTable of Numbersen_US
dc.subjectGeneral Ecologyen_US
dc.subject.otherINSECTSen_US
dc.subject.otherINVERTEBRATESen_US
dc.subject.otherCASESen_US
dc.subject.otherSILKen_US
dc.subject.otherDISTRIBUTIONen_US
dc.subject.otherDENSITYen_US
dc.subject.otherWATERen_US
dc.subject.otherTEMPERATUREen_US
dc.subject.otherVELOCITYen_US
dc.subject.otherDEPTHen_US
dc.subject.otherDISCHARGEen_US
dc.subject.otherALGAEen_US
dc.titleCaddisfly (Trichoptera) larvae distribution in the Maple River.en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.subject.hlbsecondlevelNatural Resource and Environmenten_US
dc.subject.hlbtoplevelScienceen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumBiological Station, University of Michiganen_US
dc.contributor.affiliationumcampusAnn Arboren_US
dc.description.bitstreamurlhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/54972/1/3413.pdfen_US
dc.description.filedescriptionDescription of 3413.pdf : Access restricted to on-site users at the U-M Biological Station.en_US
dc.owningcollnameBiological Station, University of Michigan (UMBS)


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